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Comment on: Maternal Exposure to Domestic Hair Cosmetics and Occupational Endocrine Disruptors Is Associated with a Higher Risk of Hypospadias in the Offspring. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 27
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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(9), 1060; doi:10.3390/ijerph14091060

Development and Evaluation of a Manganese and Iron Food Frequency Questionnaire for Pediatrics

1
Department of Environmental Health, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, 160 Panzeca Way, Kettering Laboratory, Cincinnati, OH 45267, USA
2
Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Cincinnati, 3202 Eden Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45267, USA
3
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45229, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: William Toscano
Received: 11 July 2017 / Revised: 31 August 2017 / Accepted: 6 September 2017 / Published: 14 September 2017
(This article belongs to the Section Environmental Health)
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Abstract

Manganese (Mn) is an essential nutrient, but overexposure can lead to neurotoxicity. Given the essentiality of Mn in the diet, particularly during children’s growth and development, it is imperative to quantify dietary Mn intake in populations that may be exposed to industrial sources of Mn. Dietary absorption of Mn is inversely associated with iron (Fe) stores, yet there is currently no food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) to assess dietary Mn and Fe intake. The study objective was to develop and evaluate the validity of a FFQ to measure dietary Mn and Fe intake in pediatrics by comparing the estimated intakes of Mn and Fe with biomarkers: Mn in blood and hair and Fe in serum. This study utilized a subset of the Communities Actively Researching Exposure Study (CARES) population residing in Guernsey County, Ohio. Dietary Mn was not correlated with either blood or hair Mn; however, dietary Mn and serum ferritin were significantly correlated, with a correlation coefficient of 0.51, p < 0.01. Moreover, dietary Fe and serum ferritin were also significantly correlated, with a correlation coefficient of 0.51, p < 0.01. This FFQ is a valid measurement tool for Fe intake as measured by serum ferritin; however, Mn intake did not correlate with either blood or hair Mn. View Full-Text
Keywords: manganese; iron; toxicity; diet; questionnaire; development; evaluation; Appalachian; pediatric; population manganese; iron; toxicity; diet; questionnaire; development; evaluation; Appalachian; pediatric; population
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MDPI and ACS Style

Zipkin, F.B.; Falciglia, G.A.; Kuhnell, P.; Haynes, E.N. Development and Evaluation of a Manganese and Iron Food Frequency Questionnaire for Pediatrics. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 1060.

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