Next Article in Journal
Effect of Sex and Body Mass Index on Children’s Physical Activity Intensity during Free Play at an Indoor Soft Play Center: An Exploratory Study
Previous Article in Journal
Applying Nonparametric Methods to Analyses of Short-Term Fine Particulate Matter Exposure and Hospital Admissions for Cardiovascular Diseases among Older Adults
Previous Article in Special Issue
Heat Health Messages: A Randomized Controlled Trial of a Preventative Messages Tool in the Older Population of South Australia
Article Menu
Issue 9 (September) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(9), 1055; doi:10.3390/ijerph14091055

Effects of Heat Stress on Construction Labor Productivity in Hong Kong: A Case Study of Rebar Workers

1
School of Engineering and Advanced Technology, College of Sciences, Massey University, Auckland 0745, New Zealand
2
Department of Building and Real Estate, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 1 August 2017 / Revised: 4 September 2017 / Accepted: 9 September 2017 / Published: 12 September 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Extreme Weather and Public Health)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [2897 KB, uploaded 13 September 2017]   |  

Abstract

Global warming is bringing more frequent and severe heat waves, and the result will be serious for vulnerable populations such as construction workers. Excessive heat stress has profound effects on physiological responses, which cause occupational injuries, fatalities and low productivity. Construction workers are particularly affected by heat stress, because of the body heat production caused by physically demanding tasks, and hot and humid working conditions. Field studies were conducted between August and September 2016 at two construction training grounds in Hong Kong. Onsite wet-bulb globe temperature (WBGT), workers’ heart rate (HR), and labor productivity were measured and monitored. Based on the 378 data sets of synchronized environmental, physiological, construction labor productivity (CLP), and personal variables, a CLP-heat stress model was established. It was found that WBGT, percentage of maximum HR, age, work duration, and alcohol drinking habits were determining factors for predicting the CLP (adjusted R2 = 0.68, p < 0.05). The model revealed that heat stress reduces CLP, with the percentage of direct work time decreasing by 0.33% when the WBGT increased by 1 °C. The findings in this study extend the existing practice notes by providing scientific data that may be of benefit to the industry in producing solid guidelines for working in hot weather. View Full-Text
Keywords: heat stress; construction labor productivity; steel bar fixing heat stress; construction labor productivity; steel bar fixing
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Yi, W.; Chan, A.P.C. Effects of Heat Stress on Construction Labor Productivity in Hong Kong: A Case Study of Rebar Workers. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 1055.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top