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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(8), 882; doi:10.3390/ijerph14080882

A Diagnostic Post-Occupancy Evaluation of the Nacadia® Therapy Garden

Section for Landscape Architecture and Planning, Department of Geosciences and Natural Resource Management, University of Copenhagen, 1958 Frederiksberg, Denmark
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Received: 29 May 2017 / Revised: 21 July 2017 / Accepted: 25 July 2017 / Published: 5 August 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Landscapes and Human Health)
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Abstract

The design of the Nacadia® therapy garden is based on a model for evidence-based health design in landscape architecture (EBHDL). One element of the model is a diagnostic post-occupancy evaluation (DPOE), which has not previously been fully developed. The present study develops a generic DPOE for therapy gardens, with a focus on studying the effects of the design on patients’ health outcomes. This is done in order to identify successes and failures in the design. By means of a triangulation approach, the DPOE employs a mixture of methods, and data is interpreted corroborating. The aim of the present study is to apply the DPOE to the Nacadia® therapy garden. The results of the DPOE suggest that the design of the Nacadia® therapy garden fulfills its stated aims and objectives. The overall environment of the Nacadia ® therapy garden was experienced as protective and safe, and successfully incorporated the various elements of the nature-based therapy programme. The participants encountered meaningful spaces and activities which suited their current physical and mental capabilities, and the health outcome measured by EQ-VAS (self-estimated general health) indicated a significant increase. Some design failures were identified, of which visual exposure was the most noteworthy. The DPOE model presented appears to be efficient but would nonetheless profit from being validated by other cases. View Full-Text
Keywords: natural environments; landscape architecture; health design; evidence-based design; nature-based treatment; stress-related illnesses natural environments; landscape architecture; health design; evidence-based design; nature-based treatment; stress-related illnesses
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Sidenius, U.; Karlsson Nyed, P.; Linn Lygum, V.; K. Stigsdotter, U. A Diagnostic Post-Occupancy Evaluation of the Nacadia® Therapy Garden. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 882.

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