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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(8), 877; doi:10.3390/ijerph14080877

Type and Context of Alcohol-Related Injury among Patients Presenting to Emergency Departments in a Caribbean Country

1
Department of Psychiatry, The University of the West Indies, St. Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago
2
Caribbean Institute on Addictive Disorders, Petit Bourg, Trinidad and Tobago
3
Department of Behavioural Sciences, The University of the West Indies, St. Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 28 June 2017 / Revised: 30 July 2017 / Accepted: 2 August 2017 / Published: 4 August 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Alcohol and Health)
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Abstract

There is an association between alcohol consumption and injuries in Latin America and the Caribbean. This cross-sectional study explores the socio-contextual factors of alcohol-related injuries in Trinidad and Tobago. Data on drinking patterns, injury type, drinking context prior to injury, and demographics were collected from patients presenting with injuries to the Emergency Departments (ED) of four hospitals. Findings show that 20.6% of patients had consumed alcohol, mainly beer, in the 6 h before injury. More than half were drinking at home (27%), or someone else’s home (27%). Injury most commonly occurred outdoors (36%) while in transit. Alcohol-related injuries occurred mainly because of falling or tripping (31.7%); these patients recorded the highest mean alcohol consumption prior to injury. Most persons who fell (50%) did so at home. Findings highlight the previously unreported significant risk of non-drivers sustaining injures through falling and tripping because of heavy alcohol use. Current interventions to reduce alcohol-related injury have focused on drink driving but there is a need for interventions targeting pedestrians and those who drink at home. A comprehensive multi-component approach including secondary prevention interventions in the medical setting, community educational interventions, enforcement of current legislative policies concerning the sale of alcohol, and policy initiatives surrounding road safety and alcohol outlet density should be implemented. View Full-Text
Keywords: alcohol; injury; emergency department; pedestrian; non-driver; Caribbean; Trinidad and Tobago; alcohol outlet density alcohol; injury; emergency department; pedestrian; non-driver; Caribbean; Trinidad and Tobago; alcohol outlet density
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Reid, S.D.; Gentius, J. Type and Context of Alcohol-Related Injury among Patients Presenting to Emergency Departments in a Caribbean Country. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 877.

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