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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(7), 791; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14070791

Loneliness, Insomnia and Suicidal Behavior among School-Going Adolescents in Western Pacific Island Countries: Role of Violence and Injury

1
Yonsei Global Health Center, Yonsei University, Wonju, Gangwon-do 26493, Korea
2
Department of Health Administration, Graduate School, Yonsei University, Wonju, Gangwon-do 26493, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 17 June 2017 / Revised: 8 July 2017 / Accepted: 12 July 2017 / Published: 15 July 2017
(This article belongs to the Section Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion)
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Abstract

This study aimed to examine whether being bullied, fighting, and injury, regarded in terms of frequency and nature, were significantly associated with psychological distress and suicidal behavior, independent of substance abuse and parental support in adolescents. Secondary analysis of data from the Global School-based Student Health Survey from Kiribati, the Solomon Islands, and Vanuatu was conducted. Binomial logistic regression analysis was used to examine the association of being bullied, fighting and injury with psychological health outcomes (loneliness, insomnia, suicidal ideation and suicide attempt) at a 5% level of significance. A total of 4122 students were included; 45.5% were male, and 52.0% were 14 years of age or younger. Of the total, 9.3% felt lonely and 9.5% had insomnia most of the time over the last 12 months; 27.6% had suicidal ideation, and 30.9% reported at least one suicide attempt in the last 12 months. Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that being bullied, fighting and injury were significantly associated with psychological health outcomes; adjusted odds ratios (AORs) of loneliness, insomnia, suicidal ideation and suicide attempt increased with increased exposure to bullying, fighting, and injury compared to non-exposed group. Among the types of bullying victimization, the highest AORs of insomnia and suicide attempt were among students who were left out of activities, compared to the non-bullied. Among the causes of injury, adolescents injured due to a physical attack were the most likely to report the highest AORs of loneliness, insomnia and suicidal ideation compared to those not injured. Preventing violence and injury among adolescents might contribute to better mental health and reduction of suicidal behavior. View Full-Text
Keywords: loneliness; insomnia; suicidal ideation; suicide attempt; adolescents; pacific island countries loneliness; insomnia; suicidal ideation; suicide attempt; adolescents; pacific island countries
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
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Sharma, B.; Lee, T.H.; Nam, E.W. Loneliness, Insomnia and Suicidal Behavior among School-Going Adolescents in Western Pacific Island Countries: Role of Violence and Injury. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 791.

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