Next Article in Journal
Water Consumption in European Children: Associations with Intake of Fruit Juices, Soft Drinks and Related Parenting Practices
Previous Article in Journal
Cognitive-Motivational Determinants of Residents’ Civic Engagement and Health (Inequities) in the Context of Noise Action Planning: A Conceptual Model
Article Menu
Issue 6 (June) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(6), 584; doi:10.3390/ijerph14060584

Health, Well-Being and Energy Poverty in Europe: A Comparative Study of 32 European Countries

1
School of Environment, Education and Development, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL, UK
2
Department of Social Policy and Social Work, University of York, York YO10 5DD, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Received: 13 April 2017 / Revised: 22 May 2017 / Accepted: 26 May 2017 / Published: 31 May 2017
(This article belongs to the Section Global Health)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1226 KB, uploaded 2 June 2017]   |  

Abstract

Despite growing pan-European interest in and awareness of the wide-ranging health and well-being impacts of energy poverty—which is characterised by an inability to secure adequate levels of energy services in the home—the knowledge base is largely British-centric and dominated by single-country studies. In response, this paper investigates the relationship between energy poverty, health and well-being across 32 European countries, using 2012 data from the European Quality of Life Survey. We find an uneven concentration of energy poverty, poor health, and poor well-being across Europe, with Eastern and Central Europe worst affected. At the intersection of energy poverty and health, there is a higher incidence of poor health (both physical and mental) amongst the energy poor populations of most countries, compared to non-energy poor households. Interestingly, we find the largest disparities in health and well-being levels between energy poor and non-energy poor households occur within relatively equal societies, such as Sweden and Slovenia. As well as the unique challenges brought about by rapidly changing energy landscapes in these countries, we also suggest the relative deprivation theory and processes of social comparison hold some value in explaining these findings. View Full-Text
Keywords: energy poverty; fuel poverty; relative deprivation; health inequalities; well-being energy poverty; fuel poverty; relative deprivation; health inequalities; well-being
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Thomson, H.; Snell, C.; Bouzarovski, S. Health, Well-Being and Energy Poverty in Europe: A Comparative Study of 32 European Countries. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 584.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top