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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(6), 569; doi:10.3390/ijerph14060569

Geographical Environment Factors and Risk Assessment of Tick-Borne Encephalitis in Hulunbuir, Northeastern China

1
State Key Laboratory of Resources and Environmental Information System, Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, CAS, Beijing 100101, China
2
Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao 266071, China
3
Jiangsu Center for Collaborative Innovation in Geographical Information Resource Development and Application, Nanjing 210023, China
4
National Science and Technology Infrastructure Center, Beijing 100862, China
5
State Key Laboratory of Pathogen and Biosecurity, Beijing Institute of Microbiology and Epidemiology, Beijing 100071, China
6
University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China
7
School of Public Health, Fudan University, Key Laboratory of Public Health Safety, Ministry of Education, Shanghai 200032, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 28 March 2017 / Revised: 2 May 2017 / Accepted: 20 May 2017 / Published: 26 May 2017
(This article belongs to the Section Global Health)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [6892 KB, uploaded 30 May 2017]   |  

Abstract

Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) is one of natural foci diseases transmitted by ticks. Its distribution and transmission are closely related to geographic and environmental factors. Identification of environmental determinates of TBE is of great importance to understanding the general distribution of existing and potential TBE natural foci. Hulunbuir, one of the most severe endemic areas of the disease, is selected as the study area. Statistical analysis, global and local spatial autocorrelation analysis, and regression methods were applied to detect the spatiotemporal characteristics, compare the impact degree of associated factors, and model the risk distribution using the heterogeneity. The statistical analysis of gridded geographic and environmental factors and TBE incidence show that the TBE patients mainly occurred during spring and summer and that there is a significant positive spatial autocorrelation between the distribution of TBE cases and environmental characteristics. The impact degree of these factors on TBE risks has the following descending order: temperature, relative humidity, vegetation coverage, precipitation and topography. A high-risk area with a triangle shape was determined in the central part of Hulunbuir; the low-risk area is located in the two belts next to the outside edge of the central triangle. The TBE risk distribution revealed that the impact of the geographic factors changed depending on the heterogeneity. View Full-Text
Keywords: tick-borne encephalitis; geographic and environmental factors; spatial autocorrelation; geographic weighted regression tick-borne encephalitis; geographic and environmental factors; spatial autocorrelation; geographic weighted regression
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Li, Y.; Wang, J.; Gao, M.; Fang, L.; Liu, C.; Lyu, X.; Bai, Y.; Zhao, Q.; Li, H.; Yu, H.; Cao, W.; Feng, L.; Wang, Y.; Zhang, B. Geographical Environment Factors and Risk Assessment of Tick-Borne Encephalitis in Hulunbuir, Northeastern China. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 569.

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