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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(5), 539; doi:10.3390/ijerph14050539

Inorganic Macro- and Micronutrients in “Superberries” Black Chokeberries (Aronia melanocarpa) and Related Teas

1
Division of Analytical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Horvatovac 102a, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia
2
Department of Chemistry, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Muthgasse 18, Vienna 1190, Austria
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Susanne Charlesworth
Received: 11 April 2017 / Revised: 12 May 2017 / Accepted: 16 May 2017 / Published: 18 May 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Heavy Metals: Environmental and Human Health)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [610 KB, uploaded 18 May 2017]   |  

Abstract

Black chokeberries (Aronia melanocarpa) are considered to be functional food containing high amounts of anthocyanins, phenols, antioxidants, vitamins and minerals. Whereas organic compounds are well studied, there is little research on the mineral composition of the chokeberries. Thus, the presented study is focused on the determination of Al, As, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, Pb, Se, Sr and Zn in black chokeberry fruits and infusions to study the metals’ extractability. The nutrients Ca, K and Mg are present in the fruits (dried matter) at g/kg level, whereas the other elements are present from µg/kg up to mg/kg level. The extraction yields of the metals from the infusion range from 4 (Al, Mn) up to 44% (Na). The toxic elements present do not pose any health risk when berries or infusions are consumed. Concluding, Aronia berries, as well as infusions derived from them, are a good dietary source of essential metals in addition to the organic compounds also contained. View Full-Text
Keywords: Aronia melanocarpa; berries; infusions; mineral content; extraction yield Aronia melanocarpa; berries; infusions; mineral content; extraction yield
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MDPI and ACS Style

Juranović Cindrić, I.; Zeiner, M.; Mihajlov-Konanov, D.; Stingeder, G. Inorganic Macro- and Micronutrients in “Superberries” Black Chokeberries (Aronia melanocarpa) and Related Teas. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 539.

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