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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(5), 509; doi:10.3390/ijerph14050509

Underweight, Stunting and Wasting among Children in Kilimanjaro Region, Tanzania; a Population-Based Cross-Sectional Study

1
Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, 0863 Oslo, Norway
2
Better Health for African Mother and Child, P.O. Box 8418, Moshi, Tanzania
3
Department of Nutrition, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1046, 0317 Oslo, Norway
4
Institute of Public Health, Department of Community Health, Kilimanjaro Christian Medical University College, P.O. Box 2240, Moshi, Tanzania
5
Institute of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Kilimanjaro Christian Medical University College, P.O. Box 2240, Moshi, Tanzania
6
Division of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, 0863 Oslo, Norway
7
Norwegian National Advisory Unit for Women’s Health, 0863 Oslo, Norway
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Youfa Wang
Received: 21 February 2017 / Revised: 4 May 2017 / Accepted: 5 May 2017 / Published: 10 May 2017
(This article belongs to the Section Global Health)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [423 KB, uploaded 10 May 2017]   |  

Abstract

This study assessed the prevalence and risk factors associated with underweight, stunting and wasting among children aged 0–24 months in six districts of Kilimanjaro region, northern Tanzania. A cross-sectional population-based study using a multistage, proportionate to size sampling was conducted from June 2010 to March 2011. A structured questionnaire was used to collect sociodemographic, economic, feeding and child information. Anthropometric data were collected by trained field workers, and the data were used to assess child nutritional status. A total of 1870 children were enrolled in this study. The prevalence of children classified as underweight was 46.0%, stunting was 41.9%, and wasting was 24.7%. About 33% were both underweight and stunted, and 12% had all three conditions. In a multivariate logistic regression, child age, child being ill and birth weight were associated with all anthropometric indices. Child being breastfed was associated with being underweight and wasting. Mother’s education was associated with being underweight and stunting. Fathers aged 35+ years, and living in the Hai district was associated with stunting, and being female was associated with wasting. The prevalence of child undernutrition is high in this region. Strategies that target each risk factor for child undernutrition may help to reduce the problem in the region. View Full-Text
Keywords: underweight; stunting; wasting; breastfeeding; child illness; Kilimanjaro; Tanzania underweight; stunting; wasting; breastfeeding; child illness; Kilimanjaro; Tanzania
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MDPI and ACS Style

Mgongo, M.; Chotta, N.A.S.; Hashim, T.H.; Uriyo, J.G.; Damian, D.J.; Stray-Pedersen, B.; Msuya, S.E.; Wandel, M.; Vangen, S. Underweight, Stunting and Wasting among Children in Kilimanjaro Region, Tanzania; a Population-Based Cross-Sectional Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 509.

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