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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(4), 326; doi:10.3390/ijerph14040326

Text Messaging: An Intervention to Increase Physical Activity among African American Participants in a Faith-Based, Competitive Weight Loss Program

1
School of Public Health, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA
2
College of Medicine, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32827, USA
3
College of Liberal Arts, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: George Crooks
Received: 8 January 2017 / Revised: 28 February 2017 / Accepted: 17 March 2017 / Published: 29 March 2017
(This article belongs to the Section Global Health)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [277 KB, uploaded 29 March 2017]

Abstract

African American adults are less likely to meet the recommended physical activity guidelines for aerobic and muscle-strengthening activity than Caucasian adults. The purpose of this study was to assess whether a text message intervention would increase physical activity in this population. This pilot study used a pre-/post-questionnaire non-randomized design. Participants in a faith-based weight loss competition who agreed to participate in the text messaging were assigned to the intervention group (n = 52). Participants who declined to participate in the intervention, but agreed to participate in the study, were assigned to the control group (n = 30). The text messages provided strategies for increasing physical activity and were based on constructs of the Health Belief Model and the Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills Model. Chi square tests determined the intervention group participants increased exercise time by approximately eight percent (p = 0.03), while the control group’s exercise time remained constant. The intervention group increased walking and running. The control group increased running. Most participants indicated that the health text messages were effective. The results of this pilot study suggest that text messaging may be an effective method for providing options for motivating individuals to increase physical activity. View Full-Text
Keywords: text messaging; African Americans; public health; health disparity; health education; physical activity; obesity; health communication; health behavior; behavioral theory text messaging; African Americans; public health; health disparity; health education; physical activity; obesity; health communication; health behavior; behavioral theory
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

McCoy, P.; Leggett, S.; Bhuiyan, A.; Brown, D.; Frye, P.; Williams, B. Text Messaging: An Intervention to Increase Physical Activity among African American Participants in a Faith-Based, Competitive Weight Loss Program. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 326.

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