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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(3), 334; doi:10.3390/ijerph14030334

Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals and Endometrial Cancer: An Overview of Recent Laboratory Evidence and Epidemiological Studies

Surgical and Medical Department of Translational Medicine, Sant’Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psycology, University of Rome “Sapienza”, Via di Grottarossa n° 1035, 00139 Rome, Italy
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Huixiao Hong
Received: 1 January 2017 / Revised: 13 February 2017 / Accepted: 22 February 2017 / Published: 22 March 2017
(This article belongs to the Section Environmental Health)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [364 KB, uploaded 22 March 2017]

Abstract

Background: Although exposure to endocrine disruptor compounds (EDCs) has been suggested as a contributing factor to a range of women’s health disorders including infertility, polycystic ovaries and the early onset of puberty, considerable challenges remain in attributing cause and effect on gynaecological cancer. Until recently, there were relatively few epidemiological studies examining the relationship between EDCs and endometrial cancer, however, in the last years the number of these studies has increased. Methods: A systematic MEDLINE (PubMed) search was performed and relevant articles published in the last 23 years (from 1992 to 2016) were selected. Results: Human studies and animal experiments are confirming a carcinogenic effect due to the EDC exposure and its carcinogenesis process result to be complex, multifactorial and long standing, thus, it is extremely difficult to obtain the epidemiological proof of a carcinogenic effect of EDCs for the high number of confusing factors. Conclusions: The carcinogenic effects of endocrine disruptors are plausible, although additional studies are needed to clarify their mechanisms and responsible entities. Neverthless, to reduce endocrine disruptors (ED) exposure is mandatory to implement necessary measures to limit exposure, particularly during those periods of life most vulnerable to the impact of oncogenic environmental causes, such as embryonic period and puberty. View Full-Text
Keywords: endocrine disruptors; endometrial cancer; bisphenol A; polychlorinated biphenyls; dioxin; cadmium endocrine disruptors; endometrial cancer; bisphenol A; polychlorinated biphenyls; dioxin; cadmium
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Mallozzi, M.; Leone, C.; Manurita, F.; Bellati, F.; Caserta, D. Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals and Endometrial Cancer: An Overview of Recent Laboratory Evidence and Epidemiological Studies. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 334.

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