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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(2), 201; doi:10.3390/ijerph14020201

Determinants of Health Care Services Utilization among First Generation Afghan Migrants in Istanbul

1
Department of Social Work & Social Ecology, School of Behavioral Health, Loma Linda University, 1898 Business Center Drive, San Bernardino, CA 92408, USA
2
Department of Sociology and Social Services, California State University, East Bay, 25800 Carlos Bee Blvd., Hayward, CA 94542, USA
3
Department of Public Health Sciences, UCD School of Medicine, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Med Sci 1-C, Davis, CA 95616, USA
4
Department of Health Sciences, California State University, East Bay, 25800 Carlos Bee Blvd., Hayward, CA 94542, USA
5
Department of Sociology, Galatasaray University, Istanbul 34349, Turkey
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Jimmy T. Efird and Pollie Bith-Melander
Received: 29 October 2016 / Revised: 24 January 2017 / Accepted: 13 February 2017 / Published: 17 February 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Refugee Health)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [306 KB, uploaded 17 February 2017]

Abstract

There is insufficient empirical evidence on the correlates of health care utilization of irregular migrants currently living in Turkey. The aim of this study was to identify individual level determinants associated with health service and medication use. One hundred and fifty-five Afghans completed surveys assessing service utilization including encounters with primary care physicians and outpatient specialists in addition to the use of prescription and nonprescription medicines. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were employed to examine associations between service use and a range of predisposing, enabling, and perceived need factors. Health services utilization was lowest for outpatient specialists (20%) and highest for nonprescription medications (37%). Female gender and higher income predicted encounters with primary care physicians. Income, and other enabling factors such as family presence in Turkey predicted encounters with outpatient specialists. Perceived illness-related need factors had little to no influence on use of services; however, asylum difficulties increased the likelihood for encounters with primary care physicians, outpatient services, and the use of prescription medications. This study suggests that health services use among Afghan migrants in Turkey is low considering the extent of their perceived illness-related needs, which may be further exacerbated by the precarious conditions in which they live. View Full-Text
Keywords: Afghan; Andersen Model; health services; medications; migrant; Turkey; utilization Afghan; Andersen Model; health services; medications; migrant; Turkey; utilization
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Alemi, Q.; Stempel, C.; Koga, P.M.; Smith, V.; Danis, D.; Baek, K.; Montgomery, S. Determinants of Health Care Services Utilization among First Generation Afghan Migrants in Istanbul. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 201.

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