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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(2), 195; doi:10.3390/ijerph14020195

Volatile Profiles of Emissions from Different Activities Analyzed Using Canister Samplers and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS) Analysis: A Case Study

1
Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Biologiche, Chimiche e Farmaceutiche. Università di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo, Italy
2
Agenzia Regionale per la Protezione dell’Ambiente della Sicilia, Corso Calatafimi 219, 90129 Palermo, Italy
3
Agenzia Regionale per la Protezione dell’Ambiente della Lombardia, 20100 Milano, Italy
4
Euro-Mediterranean Institute of Science and Technology (Iemest), 90128 Palermo, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 10 January 2017 / Accepted: 7 February 2017 / Published: 15 February 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Indoor Air Quality and Health 2016)
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Abstract

The objective of present study was to identify volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from several sources (fuels, traffic, landfills, coffee roasting, a street-food laboratory, building work, indoor use of incense and candles, a dental laboratory, etc.) located in Palermo (Italy) by using canister autosamplers and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) technique. In this study, 181 VOCs were monitored. In the atmosphere of Palermo city, propane, butane, isopentane, methyl pentane, hexane, benzene, toluene, meta- and para-xylene, 1,2,4 trimethyl benzene, 1,3,5 trimethyl benzene, ethylbenzene, 4 ethyl toluene and heptane were identified and quantified in all sampling sites. View Full-Text
Keywords: canister; indoor; volatile organic compounds (VOCs); Palermo canister; indoor; volatile organic compounds (VOCs); Palermo
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Orecchio, S.; Fiore, M.; Barreca, S.; Vara, G. Volatile Profiles of Emissions from Different Activities Analyzed Using Canister Samplers and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS) Analysis: A Case Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 195.

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