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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(2), 182; doi:10.3390/ijerph14020182

Perceptions of Improved Biomass and Liquefied Petroleum Gas Stoves in Puno, Peru: Implications for Promoting Sustained and Exclusive Adoption of Clean Cooking Technologies

1
Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA
2
Social and Behavioral Interventions Program, Department of International Health, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
3
Biomedical Research Unit, A.B. PRISMA, Lima 32, Peru
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Alessandra Cincinelli and Tania Martellini
Received: 12 December 2016 / Revised: 1 February 2017 / Accepted: 7 February 2017 / Published: 13 February 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Indoor Air Quality and Health 2016)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [637 KB, uploaded 13 February 2017]   |  

Abstract

Many households in low- and middle-income countries cook with inefficient biomass-burning stoves, which cause high levels of household air pollution and threaten long-term health. Although clean stoves and fuels are available, uptake and consistent use has been low. Using observations and in-depth interviews, we assessed the attitudes, preferences, and beliefs about traditional versus liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) stoves in rural Puno, Peru. A total of 31 in-depth interviews were conducted with primary cooks and their families, health workers, community leaders, and improved stove contractors. Six in-home observations of meal preparation were also conducted. Six major barriers to consistent use of clean stoves were identified: (1) perceived differences in food taste and nutrition by stove type; (2) cooking niches filled by different stoves; (3) social norms related to cooking practices; (4) safety concerns; (5) comparative costs of using different stoves; and (6) lack of awareness and concern about long-term health risks. These findings suggest that to successfully reduce household air pollution, clean cooking programs and policies must consider the many factors influencing adoption beyond health, such as cost, taste, fears, and cultural traditions. These factors could be incorporated into community-based and national efforts to scale-up sustained and exclusive adoption of clean cooking. View Full-Text
Keywords: clean fuel; liquefied petroleum gas (LPG); biomass; improved cookstoves; household air pollution; clean cooking adoption; exclusive use clean fuel; liquefied petroleum gas (LPG); biomass; improved cookstoves; household air pollution; clean cooking adoption; exclusive use
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Hollada, J.; Williams, K.N.; Miele, C.H.; Danz, D.; Harvey, S.A.; Checkley, W. Perceptions of Improved Biomass and Liquefied Petroleum Gas Stoves in Puno, Peru: Implications for Promoting Sustained and Exclusive Adoption of Clean Cooking Technologies. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 182.

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