Next Article in Journal
Do Individual and Neighborhood Characteristics Influence Perceived Air Quality?
Next Article in Special Issue
Heavy Metal Pollution and Ecological Assessment around the Jinsha Coal-Fired Power Plant (China)
Previous Article in Journal
Does Practicing CSR Makes Consumers Like Your Shop More? Consumer-Retailer Love Mediates CSR and Behavioral Intentions
Previous Article in Special Issue
Microbial Risk Assessment of Tidal−Induced Urban Flooding in Can Tho City (Mekong Delta, Vietnam)
Article Menu
Issue 12 (December) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(12), 1557; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14121557

Heavy Metal Contamination and Health Risk Assessment in the Vicinity of a Tailing Pond in Guangdong, China

1
School of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, 382 Waihuan East Road, Guangzhou 510006, China
2
The Key Lab of Pollution Control and Ecosystem Restoration in Industry Clusters, Ministry of Education, 382 Waihuan East Road, Guangzhou 510006, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 27 October 2017 / Revised: 29 November 2017 / Accepted: 30 November 2017 / Published: 12 December 2017
(This article belongs to the Collection Environmental Risk Assessment)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [2004 KB, uploaded 12 December 2017]   |  

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to assess heavy metal contamination and health risks for residents in the vicinity of a tailing pond in Guangdong, southern China. Water, soil, rice, and vegetable samples were collected from the area in the vicinity of the tailing pond. Results showed that surface water was just polluted by Ni and As, while groundwater was not contaminated by heavy metals. The concentrations of Pb, Zn, Cu, Cd, Ni, and As in the paddy soil exceeded the standard values but not those of Cr. In vegetable soils, the concentration of heavy metals was above the standard values except for Ni and As. Soil heavy metal concentrations generally decreased with increasing distance from the polluting source. Leafy vegetables were contaminated by Pb, Cr, Cd, and Ni, while the non-leafy vegetables were contaminated only by Cr. There was a significant difference in heavy metal concentrations between leafy vegetables and non-leafy vegetables. Almost all the rice was polluted by heavy metals. Diet was the most significant contributor to non-carcinogenic risk, which was significantly higher than the safe level of 1. The total cancer risk was also beyond the safe range (10−6–10−4). Results revealed that there is a risk of potential health problems to residents in the vicinity of the tailing pond. View Full-Text
Keywords: tailing pond; heavy metals; water; soil; vegetables; rice; contamination; health risk tailing pond; heavy metals; water; soil; vegetables; rice; contamination; health risk
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Liang, Y.; Yi, X.; Dang, Z.; Wang, Q.; Luo, H.; Tang, J. Heavy Metal Contamination and Health Risk Assessment in the Vicinity of a Tailing Pond in Guangdong, China. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 1557.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top