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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(11), 1396; doi:10.3390/ijerph14111396

Environmental Risks Associated with Symptoms of Acute Respiratory Infection among Preschool Children in North-Western and South-Southern Nigeria Communities

1
Ogun State Government and UPLIFT Development Foundation, Abeokuta 110001, Nigeria
2
Institute of Health and Welfare Policy, College of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, No. 155, Sec. 2, Li-Nong St., Taipei 112, Taiwan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 12 October 2017 / Revised: 8 November 2017 / Accepted: 11 November 2017 / Published: 16 November 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Global Children’s Environmental Health)
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Abstract

The exposure-disease-stress model places young children in their physical and social contexts and considers the extent and intensity of associational links to symptoms of acute respiratory infection (ARI), taking in to account a range of biological, social, and environment components. This study uses the 2013 Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey to assess the individual and environmental risks present in the North-Western and South-Southern Nigerian communities and examines their associations with ARI symptoms. The descriptive findings show that the prevalence of ARI symptoms is significantly higher among preschool children in the North-Western province (5.7%) than in the South-Southern province (1.4%) (p < 0.001). In addition to regional differences, multilevel logistic models further indicate that the increased likelihood of a child suffering from ARI symptoms is significantly associated with the dry season (aOR 1.42; 95% CI: 1.02–1.97) and household poverty (aOR 1.42; 95% CI: 1.01–1.99), even after adjusting for the cooking fuel used and various other characteristics of the children, households, and communities. These findings underscore the importance of taking into account environmental risks when addressing specific regional variations in ARI symptoms, because these determinants differ between communities in Nigeria. As it is imperative to achieve minimum levels of child health, in order to improve economic development across regions, future health policies aiming to promote child health will benefit from taking a region-specific perspective into consideration. View Full-Text
Keywords: regional disparities; acute respiratory infections; environmental risks; children; Nigeria regional disparities; acute respiratory infections; environmental risks; children; Nigeria
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Adesanya, O.A.; Chiao, C. Environmental Risks Associated with Symptoms of Acute Respiratory Infection among Preschool Children in North-Western and South-Southern Nigeria Communities. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 1396.

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