Next Article in Journal
Association between Global Life Satisfaction and Self-Rated Oral Health Conditions among Adolescents in Lithuania
Next Article in Special Issue
Integration of GIS, Electromagnetic and Electrical Methods in the Delimitation of Groundwater Polluted by Effluent Discharge (Salamanca, Spain): A Case Study
Previous Article in Journal
Genotypic and Epidemiological Trends of Acute Gastroenteritis Associated with Noroviruses in China from 2006 to 2016
Previous Article in Special Issue
Analysis of Transmission and Control of Tuberculosis in Mainland China, 2005–2016, Based on the Age-Structure Mathematical Model
Article Menu
Issue 11 (November) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessFeature PaperReview
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(11), 1342; doi:10.3390/ijerph14111342

Desert Dust and Health: A Central Asian Review and Steppe Case Study

1
School of Geography, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QY, UK
2
Oxford Rock Breakdown Lab, School of Geography, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QY, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 7 September 2017 / Revised: 23 October 2017 / Accepted: 31 October 2017 / Published: 3 November 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Hazards and Public Health: A Systems Approach)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [19035 KB, uploaded 7 November 2017]   |  

Abstract

In Asian deserts environmental and anthropomorphic dust is a significant health risk to rural populations. Natural sources in dry landscapes are exacerbated by human activities that increase the vulnerability to dust and dust-borne disease vectors. Today in Central and Inner Asian drylands, agriculture, mining, and rapid development contribute to dust generation and community exposure. Thorough review of limited dust investigation in the region implies but does not quantify health risks. Anthropogenic sources, such as the drying of the Aral Sea, highlight the shifting dust dynamics across the Central EurAsian steppe. In the Gobi Desert, our case study in Khanbogd, Mongolia addressed large-scale mining’s potential dust risk to the health of the local population. Dust traps showed variable exposure to particulates among herder households and town residents; dust density distribution indicated that sources beyond the mine need to be considered when identifying particulate sources. Research suggests that atmospheric dust from multiple causes may enhance human particulate exposure. Greater awareness of dust in greater Central Asia reflects community concern about related health implications. Future human well-being in the region will require more thorough information on dust emissions in the changing environment. View Full-Text
Keywords: dust; health risk; particulates; Central and Inner Asia; Mongolia; desert; mining; exposure dust; health risk; particulates; Central and Inner Asia; Mongolia; desert; mining; exposure
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Sternberg, T.; Edwards, M. Desert Dust and Health: A Central Asian Review and Steppe Case Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 1342.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top