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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(11), 1310; doi:10.3390/ijerph14111310

Longer Nature-Based Rehabilitation May Contribute to a Faster Return to Work in Patients with Reactions to Severe Stress and/or Depression

1
Department of Work Science, Business Economics and Environmental Psychology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 88, SE-230 53 Alnarp, Sweden
2
The Institute of Stress Medicine, Region Västra Götaland, Carl Skottsbergs Gata 22B, SE 413 19 Gothenburg, Sweden
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 18 September 2017 / Revised: 20 October 2017 / Accepted: 22 October 2017 / Published: 27 October 2017
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Abstract

The global burden of depression and stress-related mental disorders is substantial, and constitutes a major need for effective rehabilitation. Can nature-based rehabilitation help people return to work? Objective: To study if the length of a nature-based rehabilitation program affects the outcome with regard to return to work one year after the onset of the program, in a group of patients with long-term reactions to severe stress and/or depression. Methods: A prospective, quasi-experimental study comparing results from 8-, 12-, and 24-week periods of rehabilitation. The rehabilitation of 106 participants was carried out by a multimodal rehabilitation team in a specially designed rehabilitation garden. Return to work data were collected before the intervention and one year after the start of rehabilitation. In addition, data were collected regarding self-assessed occupational competence, personal control, and sense of coherence. As many as 68% of the participants returned to work or participated in job training or work-oriented measures, full- or part-time, after one year. Participants with a longer period of rehabilitation reported better results on occupational competence, and were more likely to participate in paid work, full-time or part-time, one year after rehabilitation. Study outcomes indicate that a longer rehabilitation period in a rehabilitation garden increases the possibility of a return to paid work. View Full-Text
Keywords: horticultural therapy; burnout; vocational therapy; common mental disorders; dose respond; healing garden horticultural therapy; burnout; vocational therapy; common mental disorders; dose respond; healing garden
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Grahn, P.; Pálsdóttir, A.M.; Ottosson, J.; Jonsdottir, I.H. Longer Nature-Based Rehabilitation May Contribute to a Faster Return to Work in Patients with Reactions to Severe Stress and/or Depression. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 1310.

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