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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(1), 1; doi:10.3390/ijerph14010001

Prospective Cohort Study to Elucidate the Correlation between Occupational Stress and Hypertension Risk in Oil Workers from Kelamayi City in the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region of China

1,†
,
1,†
,
1,2,†
,
1
,
1
,
1
and
1,*
1
Department of Public Health, Xinjiang Medical University, Urumqi 830011, China
2
The First Affiliated Hospital of Xinjiang Medical University, Urumqi 830011, China
These authors contributed equally to this work.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Received: 8 September 2016 / Revised: 14 December 2016 / Accepted: 15 December 2016 / Published: 22 December 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Behavior and Public Health)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [437 KB, uploaded 22 December 2016]   |  

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to assess the major risk factors for hypertension in oil workers, and investigate the effect of occupational stress on the incidence of hypertension after controlling for other risk factors. A prospective cohort approach was used following enrollment of 1354 oil workers. The occupational stress experienced by oil workers was higher than for the general population in China. By the end of the cohort study, 231 new cases of hypertension among the oil workers had been diagnosed. The cumulative incidence of hypertension was 17.06%. There were 44, 112, and 75 workers who developed hypertension in the low, intermediate, and high occupational stress groups, which represented a 12.0%, 15.6%, and 20.3% cumulative incidence, respectively (chi-square value = 9.812, p < 0.01). Multivariate Cox proportional hazard model analysis showed that type of work, cigarette smoking, excess body weight, and obesity were risk factors for hypertension (p < 0.05). After risk factors such as type of work, cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, and body mass index (BMI) were controlled, the hypertension risk (hazard ratio, HR) in the high occupational stress group was 1.549 (1.072–2.236) compared to the low exposure group, and 2.337 (1.191–4.585) in female subjects. Our study indicated that an increase in occupational stress was associated with an increased risk of hypertension after other factors were adjusted. View Full-Text
Keywords: oil workers; occupational stress; hypertension; cohort study oil workers; occupational stress; hypertension; cohort study
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MDPI and ACS Style

Li, R.; Gao, X.; Liu, B.; Ge, H.; Ning, L.; Zhao, J.; Liu, J. Prospective Cohort Study to Elucidate the Correlation between Occupational Stress and Hypertension Risk in Oil Workers from Kelamayi City in the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region of China. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 1.

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