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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13(8), 779; doi:10.3390/ijerph13080779

Depression, Anxiety and Symptoms of Stress among Baccalaureate Nursing Students in Hong Kong: A Cross-Sectional Study

1,2,†,* , 1,†
,
1,†
,
1,†
,
1,†
,
1,†
,
1,†
,
1,†
and
2,†
1
School of Nursing, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, China
2
Centre for Suicide Research and Prevention, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China
These authors contributed equally to this work.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Received: 10 June 2016 / Revised: 22 July 2016 / Accepted: 29 July 2016 / Published: 3 August 2016
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [344 KB, uploaded 3 August 2016]

Abstract

This study examines the prevalence of depression, anxiety and symptoms of stress among baccalaureate nursing students in Hong Kong. Recent epidemiological data suggest that the prevalence of mild to severe depression, anxiety and stress among qualified nurses in Hong Kong stands at 35.8%, 37.3% and 41.1%, respectively. A total of 661 nursing students were recruited to participate in our cross-sectional mental health survey using the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale 21. Multiple logistic regression was used to determine significant relationships between variables. Working in general medicine, being in financial difficulty, having sleep problems, not having leisure activity and perceiving oneself in poor mental health were significant correlates of past-week depression, anxiety and stress. Year of study, physical inactivity and family crisis in the past year correlated significantly with depression. Imbalanced diets significantly correlated with anxiety. Stress was significantly associated with a lack of alone time. This is the first study to confirm empirically that clinical specialty, financial difficulties and lifestyle factors can increase nursing students’ levels of depression and anxiety and symptoms of stress. Prevention, including the early detection and treatment of mental disorder, promises to reduce the prevalence of these indicators among this group. View Full-Text
Keywords: anxiety; DASS 21; depression; epidemiology; stress; mental health education; nursing students anxiety; DASS 21; depression; epidemiology; stress; mental health education; nursing students
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Cheung, T.; Wong, S.Y.; Wong, K.Y.; Law, L.Y.; Ng, K.; Tong, M.T.; Wong, K.Y.; Ng, M.Y.; Yip, P.S. Depression, Anxiety and Symptoms of Stress among Baccalaureate Nursing Students in Hong Kong: A Cross-Sectional Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13, 779.

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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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