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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13(7), 743; doi:10.3390/ijerph13070743

Environmental Risk Factors in Psoriasis: The Point of View of the Nutritionist

1
I.O.S. & COLEMAN Srl, 80011 Naples, Italy
2
IRCCS SDN, Napoli Via Gianturco 113, 80143 Naples, Italy
3
Dipartimento di Medicina Clinica e Chirurgia, Unit of Dermatology, Federico II University Medical School of Naples, Via Sergio Pansini 5, 80131 Naples, Italy
4
Dipartimento di Medicina Clinica e Chirurgia, Unit of Endocrinology, Federico II University Medical School of Naples, Via Sergio Pansini 5, 80131 Naples, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Peter Clifton
Received: 28 May 2016 / Revised: 1 July 2016 / Accepted: 19 July 2016 / Published: 22 July 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environmental Diseases)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [300 KB, uploaded 22 July 2016]

Abstract

Psoriasis is a common, chronic, immune-mediated skin disease with systemic pro-inflammatory activation, where both environmental and genetic factors contribute to its pathogenesis. Among the risk factors for psoriasis, evidence is accumulating that nutrition plays a major role, per se, in psoriasis pathogenesis. In particular, body weight, nutrition, and diet may exacerbate the clinical manifestations, or even trigger the disease. Understanding the epidemiological relationship between obesity and psoriasis is also important for delineating the risk profile for the obesity-related comorbidities commonly found among psoriatic patients. Moreover, obesity can affect both drug’s pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Additionally, the overall beneficial effects on the obesity-associated comorbidities, clinical recommendations to reduce weight and to adopt a healthy lifestyle could improve the psoriasis severity, particularly in those patients with moderate to severe disease, thus exerting additional therapeutic effects in the conventional treatment in obese patients with psoriasis. Education regarding modifiable environmental factors is essential in the treatment of this disease and represents one of the primary interventions that can affect the prognosis of patients with psoriasis. The goal is to make psoriatic patients and health care providers aware of beneficial dietary interventions. The aim of this review is to assess the relevance of the environmental factors as modifiable risk factors in psoriasis pathogenesis, with particular regard to the involvement of obesity and nutrition in the management of psoriasis, providing also specific nutrition recommendations. View Full-Text
Keywords: environmental risk factors; nutritionist; obesity; body composition; bioelectrical impedance analysis; phase angle; lifestyle; nutrition; Mediterranean diet environmental risk factors; nutritionist; obesity; body composition; bioelectrical impedance analysis; phase angle; lifestyle; nutrition; Mediterranean diet
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Barrea, L.; Nappi, F.; Di Somma, C.; Savanelli, M.C.; Falco, A.; Balato, A.; Balato, N.; Savastano, S. Environmental Risk Factors in Psoriasis: The Point of View of the Nutritionist. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13, 743.

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