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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13(6), 583; doi:10.3390/ijerph13060583

A Bibliometric Analysis of PubMed Literature on Middle East Respiratory Syndrome

Zhejiang Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 3399 Binsheng Road, Binjiang District, Zhejiang 310051, China
These authors contributed equally to this work.
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Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Received: 15 May 2016 / Revised: 5 June 2016 / Accepted: 7 June 2016 / Published: 13 June 2016
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Abstract

Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS), a pandemic threat to human beings, has aroused huge concern worldwide, but no bibliometric studies have been conducted on MERS research. The aim of this study was to map research productivity on the disease based on the articles indexed in PubMed. The articles related to MERS dated from 2012 to 2015 were retrieved from PubMed. The articles were classified into three categories according to their focus. Publication outputs were assessed and frequently used terms were mapped using the VOS viewer software. A total of 443 articles were included for analysis. They were published in 162 journals, with Journal of Virology being the most productive (44 articles; 9.9%) and by six types of organizations, with universities being the most productive (276 articles; 62.4%).The largest proportion of the articles focused on basic medical sciences and clinical studies (47.2%) and those on prevention and control ranked third (26.2%), with those on other focuses coming in between (26.6%). The articles on prevention and control had the highest mean rank for impact factor (IF) (226.34), followed by those on basic medical sciences and clinical studies (180.23) and those on other focuses (168.03). The mean rank differences were statistically significant (p = 0.000). Besides, “conronavirus”, “case”, “transmission” and “detection” were found to be the most frequently used terms. The findings of this first bibliometric study on MERS suggest that the prevention and control of the disease has become a big concern and related research should be strengthened. View Full-Text
Keywords: Middle East Respiratory Syndrome; MERS; literature review; bibliometrics Middle East Respiratory Syndrome; MERS; literature review; bibliometrics
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Wang, Z.; Chen, Y.; Cai, G.; Jiang, Z.; Liu, K.; Chen, B.; Jiang, J.; Gu, H. A Bibliometric Analysis of PubMed Literature on Middle East Respiratory Syndrome. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13, 583.

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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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