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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13(6), 530; doi:10.3390/ijerph13060530

Weight Gain Prevention among Midlife Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial to Address Needs Related to the Physical and Social Environment

1
Unity Point Health-Des Moines, 1200 Pleasant Street, Des Moines, IA 50309, USA
2
Consumer Centric Solutions, St. Paul, MN 55116, USA
3
Clinical and Translational Science Institute, University of Minnesota, 717 Delaware St SE, 1-25, Minneapolis, MN 55414, USA
4
Yale School of Public Health, 60 College Street, New Haven, CT 06510, USA
5
Department of Food Science and Nutrition, University of Minnesota, 1334 Eckles Ave, St. Paul, MN 55108, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Sara Kirk, Jessie-Lee Mclsaac and Tarra Penney
Received: 29 February 2016 / Revised: 19 May 2016 / Accepted: 20 May 2016 / Published: 25 May 2016
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [448 KB, uploaded 25 May 2016]   |  

Abstract

Women tend to gain weight at midlife (40–60 years) increasing risk of obesity-related chronic diseases. Within specific eating occasions, needs related to the physical and social environment may result in less healthy eating behavior, which can lead to weight gain over time. The purpose of this study was to determine if a dietitian-delivered nutrition counseling intervention tailored to eating occasion needs could improve diet and prevent weight gain among midlife women over two years. A randomized controlled trial was conducted with healthy midlife women (n = 354) in one U.S. metropolitan area. The intervention group (n = 185) received ten hours of individual nutrition counseling from dietitians over six months, while women in a control group (n = 169) received no counseling. Measured height, weight and waist circumference, and dietary intakes were collected at baseline and every six months over two years. Mixed linear models were used to test for intervention effect on change in outcome variables over time. Dietary intakes of fruit, reduced/low-fat dairy foods and refined grains were significantly improved over time in the intervention compared to control group. However, the intervention had no effect on weight over time (p = 0.48). Nutrition counseling tailored to address eating occasion needs improved self-reported diet but did not significantly affect weight change. View Full-Text
Keywords: weight gain prevention; midlife; women; eating occasions; environment weight gain prevention; midlife; women; eating occasions; environment
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Perry, C.D.; Degeneffe, D.; Davey, C.; Kollannoor-Samuel, G.; Reicks, M. Weight Gain Prevention among Midlife Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial to Address Needs Related to the Physical and Social Environment. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13, 530.

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