Next Article in Journal
Association of Safe Disposal of Child Feces and Reported Diarrhea in Indonesia: Need for Stronger Focus on a Neglected Risk
Next Article in Special Issue
A Survey of Accidental Hypothermia Knowledge among Navy Members in China and the Implications for Training
Previous Article in Journal
Adolescent Overweight and Obesity: Links to Socioeconomic Status and Fruit and Vegetable Intakes
Previous Article in Special Issue
Slaughterhouses Fungal Burden Assessment: A Contribution for the Pursuit of a Better Assessment Strategy
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13(3), 309; doi:10.3390/ijerph13030309

The Risk Implications of Globalisation: An Exploratory Analysis of 105 Major Industrial Incidents (1971–2010)

Queen’s Management School, Queen’s University Belfast, Riddel Hall, 185 Stranmillis Rd., Belfast BT9 5EE, Northern Ireland, UK
Academic Editor: Andrew Watterson
Received: 29 December 2015 / Revised: 29 February 2016 / Accepted: 3 March 2016 / Published: 10 March 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occupational Safety and Related Impacts on Health and the Environment)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [967 KB, uploaded 10 March 2016]   |  

Abstract

This paper revisits work on the socio-political amplification of risk, which predicts that those living in developing countries are exposed to greater risk than residents of developed nations. This prediction contrasts with the neoliberal expectation that market driven improvements in working conditions within industrialising/developing nations will lead to global convergence of hazard exposure levels. It also contradicts the assumption of risk society theorists that there will be an ubiquitous increase in risk exposure across the globe, which will primarily affect technically more advanced countries. Reviewing qualitative evidence on the impact of structural adjustment reforms in industrialising countries, the export of waste and hazardous waste recycling to these countries and new patterns of domestic industrialisation, the paper suggests that workers in industrialising countries continue to face far greater levels of hazard exposure than those of developed countries. This view is confirmed when a data set including 105 major multi-fatality industrial disasters from 1971 to 2000 is examined. The paper concludes that there is empirical support for the predictions of socio-political amplification of risk theory, which finds clear expression in the data in a consistent pattern of significantly greater fatality rates per industrial incident in industrialising/developing countries. View Full-Text
Keywords: industrial incidents; gobalisation; socio-political amplification of risk; risk society; neoliberalism; post-neoliberalism; developing countries; industrialising countries; developed countries industrial incidents; gobalisation; socio-political amplification of risk; risk society; neoliberalism; post-neoliberalism; developing countries; industrialising countries; developed countries
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Beck, M. The Risk Implications of Globalisation: An Exploratory Analysis of 105 Major Industrial Incidents (1971–2010). Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13, 309.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top