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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13(12), 1188; doi:10.3390/ijerph13121188

Aniline Induces Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis of Primary Cultured Hepatocytes

1
Department of Occupational Health, College of Public Health, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086, China
2
Department of Sanitary Microorganisms, College of Public Health, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086, China
3
Department of Environmental Health, College of Public Health, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086, China
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Received: 12 August 2016 / Revised: 17 November 2016 / Accepted: 26 November 2016 / Published: 30 November 2016
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Abstract

The toxicity and carcinogenicity of aniline in humans and animals have been well documented. However, the molecular mechanism involved in aniline-induced liver toxicity and carcinogenesis remains unclear. In our research, primary cultured hepatocytes were exposed to aniline (0, 1.25, 2.50, 5.0 and 10.0 μg/mL) for 24 h in the presence or absence of N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC). Levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), malondialdehyde (MDA), and glutathione (GSH), activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), mitochondrial membrane potential, DNA damage, cell viability, and apoptosis were detected. Levels of ROS and MDA were significantly increased and levels of GSH and CAT, activity of SOD, and mitochondrial membrane potential in hepatocytes were significantly decreased by aniline compared with the negative control group. The tail moment and DNA content of the tail in exposed groups were significantly higher than those in the negative control group. Cell viability was reduced and apoptotic death was induced by aniline in a concentration-dependent manner. The phenomena of ROS generation, oxidative damage, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, DNA damage and apoptosis could be prevented if ROS inhibitor NAC was added. ROS generation is involved in the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and DNA injury, which may play a role in aniline-induced apoptosis in hepatocytes. Our study provides insight into the mechanism of aniline-induced toxicity and apoptosis of hepatocytes. View Full-Text
Keywords: aniline; apoptosis; reactive oxygen species; hepatocytes aniline; apoptosis; reactive oxygen species; hepatocytes
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MDPI and ACS Style

Wang, Y.; Gao, H.; Na, X.-L.; Dong, S.-Y.; Dong, H.-W.; Yu, J.; Jia, L.; Wu, Y.-H. Aniline Induces Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis of Primary Cultured Hepatocytes. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13, 1188.

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