Next Article in Journal
Neonicotinoid Insecticides Alter the Gene Expression Profile of Neuron-Enriched Cultures from Neonatal Rat Cerebellum
Next Article in Special Issue
A Spatial Hierarchical Analysis of the Temporal Influences of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation and Weather on Dengue in Kalutara District, Sri Lanka
Previous Article in Journal
Characterization of Airborne Particles Collected from Car Engine Air Filters Using SEM and EDX Techniques
Previous Article in Special Issue
Economic Burden of Hospitalizations for Heat-Related Illnesses in the United States, 2001–2010
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13(10), 982; doi:10.3390/ijerph13100982

Susceptibility to Heat-Related Fluid and Electrolyte Imbalance Emergency Department Visits in Atlanta, Georgia, USA

1
Department of Environmental Health, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, 1518 Clifton Road NE, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
2
Department of Geography, Franklin College of Arts and Sciences, The University of Georgia, 210 Field Street, Athens, GA 30602, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Jan C. Semenza
Received: 1 August 2016 / Revised: 22 September 2016 / Accepted: 22 September 2016 / Published: 2 October 2016
(This article belongs to the Collection Climate Change and Human Health)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1946 KB, uploaded 2 October 2016]   |  

Abstract

Identification of populations susceptible to heat effects is critical for targeted prevention and more accurate risk assessment. Fluid and electrolyte imbalance (FEI) may provide an objective indicator of heat morbidity. Data on daily ambient temperature and FEI emergency department (ED) visits were collected in Atlanta, Georgia, USA during 1993–2012. Associations of warm-season same-day temperatures and FEI ED visits were estimated using Poisson generalized linear models. Analyses explored associations between FEI ED visits and various temperature metrics (maximum, minimum, average, and diurnal change in ambient temperature, apparent temperature, and heat index) modeled using linear, quadratic, and cubic terms to allow for non-linear associations. Effect modification by potential determinants of heat susceptibility (sex; race; comorbid congestive heart failure, kidney disease, and diabetes; and neighborhood poverty and education levels) was assessed via stratification. Higher warm-season ambient temperature was significantly associated with FEI ED visits, regardless of temperature metric used. Stratified analyses suggested heat-related risks for all populations, but particularly for males. This work highlights the utility of FEI as an indicator of heat morbidity, the health threat posed by warm-season temperatures, and the importance of considering susceptible populations in heat-health research. View Full-Text
Keywords: climate change; temperature; heat morbidity; fluid and electrolyte imbalance; emergency department visits climate change; temperature; heat morbidity; fluid and electrolyte imbalance; emergency department visits
Figures

Figure 1a

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Heidari, L.; Winquist, A.; Klein, M.; O’Lenick, C.; Grundstein, A.; Ebelt Sarnat, S. Susceptibility to Heat-Related Fluid and Electrolyte Imbalance Emergency Department Visits in Atlanta, Georgia, USA. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13, 982.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top