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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13(10), 1010; doi:10.3390/ijerph13101010

Effects of Lane Width, Lane Position and Edge Shoulder Width on Driving Behavior in Underground Urban Expressways: A Driving Simulator Study

1
School of Transportation Engineering, Tongji University, 4800 Cao’an Highway, Shanghai 201804, China
2
Department of Civil Engineering and Applied Mechanics, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 0C3, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Feng Chen and Suren Chen
Received: 17 July 2016 / Revised: 4 October 2016 / Accepted: 7 October 2016 / Published: 14 October 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Traffic Safety and Injury Prevention)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [2457 KB, uploaded 14 October 2016]   |  

Abstract

This study tested the effects of lane width, lane position and edge shoulder width on driving behavior for a three-lane underground urban expressway. A driving simulator was used with 24 volunteer test subjects. Five lane widths (2.85, 3.00, 3.25, 3.50, and 3.75 m) and three shoulder widths (0.50, 0.75, and 1.00 m) were studied. Driving speed, lane deviation and subjective perception of driving behavior were collected as performance measures. The results show that lane and shoulder width have significant effects on driving speed. Average driving speed increases from 60.01 km/h in the narrowest lane to 88.05 km/h in the widest lane. While both narrower lanes and shoulders result in reduced speed and lateral lane deviation, the effect of lane width is greater than that of shoulder width. When the lane and shoulder are narrow, drivers in the left or right lane tend to shy away from the tunnel wall, even encroaching into the neighboring middle lane. As the lane or shoulder gets wider, drivers tend to stay in the middle of the lane. An interesting finding is that although few participants acknowledged that lane position had any great bearing on their driving behaviors, the observed driving speed is statistically higher in the left lane than in the other two lanes when the lane width is narrow (in 2.85, 3 and 3.25 m lanes). These findings provided support for amending the current design specifications of urban underground roads, such as the relationship between design speed and lane width, speed limit, and combination form of lanes. View Full-Text
Keywords: underground urban expressway; lane width; lane position; shoulder width; driving behavior underground urban expressway; lane width; lane position; shoulder width; driving behavior
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Liu, S.; Wang, J.; Fu, T. Effects of Lane Width, Lane Position and Edge Shoulder Width on Driving Behavior in Underground Urban Expressways: A Driving Simulator Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13, 1010.

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