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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13(10), 1005; doi:10.3390/ijerph13101005

Bread and Roses: A Gender Perspective on Environmental Justice and Public Health

School for Policy Studies, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TZ, UK
Academic Editors: Jayajit Chakraborty, Sara E. Grineski and Timothy W. Collins
Received: 2 May 2016 / Revised: 20 September 2016 / Accepted: 26 September 2016 / Published: 12 October 2016
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [317 KB, uploaded 21 October 2016]

Abstract

Gender continues to be a relatively marginal issue in environmental justice debates and yet it remains an important aspect of injustice. To help redress the balance, this article explores women’s experience of environmental justice through a review of the existing literature and the author’s prior qualitative research, as well as her experience of environmental activism. The analysis confirms that women tend to experience inequitable environmental burdens (distributional injustice); and are less likely than men to have control over environmental decisions (procedural injustice), both of which impact on their health (substantive injustice). It is argued that these injustices occur because women generally have lower incomes than men and are perceived as having less social status than their male counterparts as a result of entwined and entrenched capitalist and patriarchal processes. In the light of this analysis, it is proposed that environmental justice research, teaching, policy and practice should be made more gender aware and feminist orientated. This could support cross-cutting debates and activities in support of the radical social change necessary to bring about greater social and environmental justice more generally. View Full-Text
Keywords: equality; women; discrimination; environment; hazards; decision-making; feminism; ecology; capitalism; patriarchy equality; women; discrimination; environment; hazards; decision-making; feminism; ecology; capitalism; patriarchy
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Bell, K. Bread and Roses: A Gender Perspective on Environmental Justice and Public Health. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13, 1005.

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