Next Article in Journal
Prevalence and Correlates of Prehypertension and Hypertension among Adults in Northeastern China: A Cross-Sectional Study
Previous Article in Journal
A Comparative Study of Scientific Publications in Health Care Sciences and Services from Mainland China, Taiwan, Japan, and India (2007–2014)
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13(1), 80; doi:10.3390/ijerph13010080

Improving Knowledge about Children’s Environmental Health in Northwest China

1
Departments of Environmental Medicine, Lanzhou University School of Public Health, 199 Donggang Xi Lu, Lanzhou, Gansu 730000, China
2
Department of Pediatrics, New York University School of Medicine, 227 East 30th Street, Rm 735, New York, NY 10016, USA
3
Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine/Bellevue Hospital Center, New York, NY 10016, USA
4
New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016, USA
5
Wagner School of Public Service, New York University, New York, NY 10012, USA
6
Department of Nutrition, Food & Public Health, Steinhardt School of Culture, Education and Human Development, New York University, New York, NY 10003, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Helena Solo-Gabriele and Alesia Ferguson
Received: 12 October 2015 / Revised: 10 December 2015 / Accepted: 18 December 2015 / Published: 25 December 2015
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [203 KB, uploaded 25 December 2015]

Abstract

The main purpose of this study was to identify policy maker opinions and attitudes towards children’s environmental health (CEH), potential barriers to child-specific protective legislation and implementation in northwest China, and evaluate knowledge and attitudes about CEH before and after an educational conference. We conducted seventy-two interviews with regional officials, researchers and non-governmental organization representatives from five provinces, and surveyed participants (forty-seven) before and after an educational conference in northwest China about CEH. Interviews identified general consensus among participants of the adverse effects of air pollution on children, yet few participants knew of policies to protect them. Barriers identified included limited funding and enforcement, weak regional governments and absence of child-specific policy-making. After the conference, substantially greater self-efficacy was identified for lead, mercury, air pollution and polychlorinated biphenyls (+0.57–0.72 on a 1–5 Likert scale, p = 0.002–0.013), and the scientific knowledge for the role of environment in children’s health (+0.58, p = 0.015), and health care provider control (+0.52, p = 0.025) were rated more strongly. We conclude that policy makers in Northwest China appreciate that children are uniquely vulnerable, though additional regulations are needed to account for that vulnerability. Further research should examine effectiveness of the intervention on a larger scale and scope, and evaluate the usefulness of such interventions in translating research into improved care/reduced exposure to environmental hazards. View Full-Text
Keywords: children’s environmental health; policy making; air pollution; educational intervention children’s environmental health; policy making; air pollution; educational intervention
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Niu, J.; Qu, Q.; Li, J.; Liu, X.; Zhang, B.; Li, Z.; Ding, G.; Sun, Y.; Shi, Y.; Wan, Y.; Hu, X.; Chen, L.-C.; Mendelsohn, A.; Chen, Y.; Trasande, L. Improving Knowledge about Children’s Environmental Health in Northwest China. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13, 80.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top