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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13(1), 46; doi:10.3390/ijerph13010046

Beliefs and Behaviors about Breast Cancer Recurrence Risk Reduction among African American Breast Cancer Survivors

1
Institute of Public & Preventive Health, Georgia Regents University, CJ-2300 1120 15th Street Augusta, GA 30912, USA
2
College of Dental Medicine, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, GA 30912, USA
3
SISTAAH Talk Breast Cancer Support Group, Miami, FL 33169, USA
4
Department of Community Health and Sustainability, Division of Public Health, University of Massachusetts, Lowell, MA 01854, USA
5
Department of Family Medicine, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, GA 30912, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Mark Edberg, Barbara E. Hayes, Valerie Montgomery Rice and Paul B. Tchounwou
Received: 11 August 2015 / Revised: 17 November 2015 / Accepted: 24 November 2015 / Published: 23 December 2015
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [210 KB, uploaded 23 December 2015]

Abstract

A growing body of evidence suggests that breast cancer recurrence risk is linked to lifestyle behaviors. This study examined correlations between breast cancer recurrence, risk reduction beliefs, and related behaviors among African American breast cancer survivors (AA BCSs). Study participants included 191 AA BCSs, mean age = 56.3 years, who completed a lifestyle assessment tool. Most respondents believed that being overweight (52.7%), lack of physical activity (48.7%), and a high fat diet (63.2%) are associated with breast cancer recurrence. Over 65% considered themselves overweight; one third (33.5%) agreed that losing weight could prevent recurrence, 33.0% disagreed, while the remaining 33.5% did not know; and nearly half (47.9%) believed that recurrence could be prevented by increasing physical activity. Almost 90% survivors with BMI < 25 Kg/M2 reported no recurrence compared to 75.7% with BMI ≥ 25 Kg/M2 (p = 0.06); nearly all of the women (99.2%) answered “yes” to seeking professional help to lose weight, 79.7% of which were recurrence-free (p = 0.05). These results provide information about AA BCSs’ beliefs and behaviors protective against breast cancer recurrence. Additional research is warranted to determine the effectiveness of educational interventions for AA BCSs that promote consumption of a healthy diet and engaging in regular physical activity. View Full-Text
Keywords: African Americans; breast cancer; recurrence; risk factors; diet; physical activity; body weight; survivorship African Americans; breast cancer; recurrence; risk factors; diet; physical activity; body weight; survivorship
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Ansa, B.; Yoo, W.; Whitehead, M.; Coughlin, S.; Smith, S. Beliefs and Behaviors about Breast Cancer Recurrence Risk Reduction among African American Breast Cancer Survivors. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13, 46.

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