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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13(1), 48; doi:10.3390/ijerph13010048

Differences in Colorectal Cancer Outcomes by Race and Insurance

1
Institute of Public Health, College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Florida A&M University, Tallahassee, FL 32307, USA
2
Residential Services Administrator, Marianna, FL 32448, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Mark Edberg, Barbara E. Hayes, Valerie Montgomery Rice and Paul B. Tchounwou
Received: 4 September 2015 / Revised: 20 November 2015 / Accepted: 24 November 2015 / Published: 22 December 2015
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [180 KB, uploaded 23 December 2015]

Abstract

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cancer among African American women and the third most common cancer for African American men. The mortality rate from CRC is highest among African Americans compared to any other racial or ethnic group. Much of the disparity in mortality is likely due to diagnosis at later stages of the disease, which could result from unequal access to screening. The purpose of this study is to determine the impact of race and insurance status on CRC outcomes among CRC patients. Data were drawn from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database. Logistic regressions models were used to examine the odds of receiving treatment after adjusting for insurance, race, and other variables. Cox proportional hazard models were used to measure the risk of CRC death after adjusting for sociodemographic and tumor characteristics when associating race and insurance with CRC-related death. Blacks were diagnosed at more advanced stages of disease than whites and had an increased risk of death from both colon and rectal cancers. Lacking insurance was associated with an increase in CRC related-deaths. Findings from this study could help profile and target patients with the greatest disparities in CRC health outcomes. View Full-Text
Keywords: colorectal health; access to care; health disparities; social determinants of health colorectal health; access to care; health disparities; social determinants of health
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Tawk, R.; Abner, A.; Ashford, A.; Brown, C.P. Differences in Colorectal Cancer Outcomes by Race and Insurance. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13, 48.

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