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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13(1), 137; doi:10.3390/ijerph13010137

Using a Household Food Inventory to Assess the Availability of Traditional Vegetables among Resettled African Refugees

1
School of Health Sciences, Mount Kenya University, P.O. Box 342, Thika 01000, Kenya
2
School of Allied Health, Australian Catholic University, P.O. Box 456, Virginia, Brisbane 4001, Australia
3
Population and Social Health Research Program, Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Griffith University, Gold Coast 4222, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Received: 26 October 2015 / Revised: 30 November 2015 / Accepted: 5 January 2016 / Published: 18 January 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Migrant Health)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [270 KB, uploaded 18 January 2016]

Abstract

A cross-sectional sequential explanatory mixed methods study was conducted among household food preparers to examine the association between home availability and consumption of traditional vegetables among resettled African refugees living in Queensland, Australia. Home availability of traditional African vegetables was associated with age, having a vegetable garden, employment status, and having a supermarket in the local neighborhood. Food preparers from homes with low vegetable availability were less likely to consume the recommended number of vegetable servings. Barriers faced in the food environment included language, lack of availability of traditional vegetables and lack of transport. All of these aspects contributed to the study findings that both individual and food environment characteristics may play a role in access to and availability of food and vegetable consumption of resettled refugees. Consumption of traditional foods among the resettled refugees continues post resettlement. View Full-Text
Keywords: household food inventory; African traditional vegetables; vegetable availability; vegetable intake; resettled African refugees; migration household food inventory; African traditional vegetables; vegetable availability; vegetable intake; resettled African refugees; migration
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Gichunge, C.; Somerset, S.; Harris, N. Using a Household Food Inventory to Assess the Availability of Traditional Vegetables among Resettled African Refugees. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13, 137.

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