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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13(1), 111; doi:10.3390/ijerph13010111

Housing Stakeholder Preferences for the “Soft” Features of Sustainable and Healthy Housing Design in the UK

1
Department of the Built Environment, Liverpool John Moores University, Cherie Booth Building, Byrom Street, Liverpool L3 3AF, UK
2
School of Environmental Sciences, University of Liverpool, Jane Herdman Building, Liverpool L69 3GP, UK
3
School of Life Sciences, Centre for Biomolecular Science, The University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD, UK
4
Institute of Land Management and Geomatics, Faculty of Water and Land Management, Aleksandras Stulginskis University, Universiteto 10, Akademija, Kaunas LT-53361, Lithuania
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Harry Timmermans, Astrid Kemperman and Pauline van den Berg
Received: 30 October 2015 / Revised: 18 December 2015 / Accepted: 22 December 2015 / Published: 7 January 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Impacts of the Built Environment on Public Health)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1319 KB, uploaded 7 January 2016]   |  

Abstract

It is widely recognised that the quantity and sustainability of new homes in the UK need to increase. However, it is important that sustainable housing is regarded holistically, and not merely in environmental terms, and incorporates elements that enhance the quality of life, health and well-being of its users. This paper focuses on the “soft” features of sustainable housing, that is, the non-technological components of sustainable housing and neighbourhood design that can impact occupants’ health and well-being. Aims of the study are to ascertain the relative level of importance that key housing stakeholders attach to these features and to investigate whether the opinions of housing users and housing providers are aligned with regards to their importance. An online survey was carried out to gauge the level of importance that the key stakeholders, such as housing users, local authorities, housing associations, and developers (n = 235), attach to these features. Results revealed that while suitable indoor space was the feature regarded as most important by all stakeholders, there were also a number of disparities in opinion between housing users and housing providers (and among the different types of providers). This implies a scope for initiatives to achieve a better alignment between housing users and providers. View Full-Text
Keywords: sustainable housing; quality of life; health and well-being; housing stakeholder; preference survey; soft feature sustainable housing; quality of life; health and well-being; housing stakeholder; preference survey; soft feature
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MDPI and ACS Style

Prochorskaite, A.; Couch, C.; Malys, N.; Maliene, V. Housing Stakeholder Preferences for the “Soft” Features of Sustainable and Healthy Housing Design in the UK. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13, 111.

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