Next Article in Journal
An Evaluation on the Effect of Health Education and of Low-Dose Statin in Dyslipidemia among Low-Income Rural Uyghur Adults in Far Western China: A Comprehensive Intervention Study
Previous Article in Journal
Improving Personal Characterization of Meaningful Activity in Adults with Chronic Conditions Living in a Low-Income Housing Community
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12(9), 11396-11409; doi:10.3390/ijerph120911396

Impact of Cadmium Exposure on the Association between Lipopolysaccharide and Metabolic Syndrome

1
Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Ajou University School of Medicine, 164, World Cup-ro, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon 443-380, Korea
2
Cardiovascular and Metabolic Disease Etiology Research Center, Ajou University School of Medicine, 164, World Cup-ro, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon 443-380, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Received: 30 July 2015 / Revised: 21 August 2015 / Accepted: 6 September 2015 / Published: 11 September 2015
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [686 KB, uploaded 11 September 2015]

Abstract

Cadmium (Cd) is an environmental contaminant that has a direct impact on the gut microbiome. Perturbations in the gut microbiome have been linked to metabolic disorders associated with inflammation generated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We investigated the impact of Cd on the association between LPS and metabolic syndrome. The study population consisted of 200 apparently healthy subjects (30–64 years of age; 96 men, 104 women). Serum LPS and blood Cd concentrations were measured by ELISA and graphite furnace-atomic absorption spectrophotometry (GF-AAS), respectively. The highest LPS quartile was associated with a greater prevalence of metabolic syndrome in men. There was a significant association between LPS activity and metabolic syndrome in men with blood Cd concentrations higher than the 50th percentile (OR = 3.05, 95% CI = 1.39–6.70); however, this relationship was not significant in men with blood Cd concentrations lower than the 50th percentile. The results of this study provide evidence for a strong association between high LPS activity and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in men with relatively high blood Cd concentrations. Therefore, exposure to Cd may potentiate the association between LPS and metabolic syndrome in men. View Full-Text
Keywords: microbes; metabolic syndrome; cadmium; lipopolysaccharide microbes; metabolic syndrome; cadmium; lipopolysaccharide
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Supplementary material

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Han, S.J.; Ha, K.H.; Jeon, J.Y.; Kim, H.J.; Lee, K.W.; Kim, D.J. Impact of Cadmium Exposure on the Association between Lipopolysaccharide and Metabolic Syndrome. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12, 11396-11409.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top