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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12(6), 6218-6231; doi:10.3390/ijerph120606218

Petroleum Coke in the Urban Environment: A Review of Potential Health Effects

1
Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201, USA
2
Center for Molecular Medicine and Genetics, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201, USA
3
Transnational Environmental Law Clinic, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201, USA
4
Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48073, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Received: 19 March 2015 / Revised: 22 May 2015 / Accepted: 26 May 2015 / Published: 29 May 2015
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [664 KB, uploaded 29 May 2015]

Abstract

Petroleum coke, or petcoke, is a granular coal-like industrial by-product that is separated during the refinement of heavy crude oil. Recently, the processing of material from Canadian oil sands in U.S. refineries has led to the appearance of large petcoke piles adjacent to urban communities in Detroit and Chicago. The purpose of this literature review is to assess what is known about the effects of petcoke exposure on human health. Toxicological studies in animals indicate that dermal or inhalation petcoke exposure does not lead to a significant risk for cancer development or reproductive and developmental effects. However, pulmonary inflammation was observed in long-term inhalation exposure studies. Epidemiological studies in coke oven workers have shown increased risk for cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, but these studies are confounded by multiple industrial exposures, most notably to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons that are generated during petcoke production. The main threat to urban populations in the vicinity of petcoke piles is most likely fugitive dust emissions in the form of fine particulate matter. More research is required to determine whether petcoke fine particulate matter causes or exacerbates disease, either alone or in conjunction with other environmental contaminants. View Full-Text
Keywords: petroleum coke; petcoke; urban health; environmental toxicology petroleum coke; petcoke; urban health; environmental toxicology
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Caruso, J.A.; Zhang, K.; Schroeck, N.J.; McCoy, B.; McElmurry, S.P. Petroleum Coke in the Urban Environment: A Review of Potential Health Effects. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12, 6218-6231.

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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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