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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12(5), 5013-5025; doi:10.3390/ijerph120505013

Chinese Pediatrician Attitudes and Practices Regarding Child Exposure to Secondhand Smoke (SHS) and Clinical Efforts against SHS Exposure

1
School of Public Health, Guangxi Medical University, Nanning, Guangxi 530021, China
2
Global Health Program, Duke Kunshan University, Kunshan, Jiangsu 215347, China
3
Duke Global Health Institute, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA
4
School of Medicine, Boston Medical Center, Boston University, Boston, MA 02118, USA
5
Department of Pediatrics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical University, Nanning, Guangxi 530021, China
6
Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Center for Child and Adolescent Health Research and Policy, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Received: 25 February 2015 / Revised: 27 April 2015 / Accepted: 28 April 2015 / Published: 8 May 2015
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Abstract

Background: Secondhand Smoke (SHS) exposure is a leading cause of childhood illness and premature death. Pediatricians play an important role in helping parents to quit smoking and reducing children’s SHS exposure. This study examined Chinese pediatricians’ attitudes and practices regarding children’s exposure to SHS and clinical efforts against SHS exposure. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of pediatricians was conducted in thirteen conveniently selected hospitals in southern China, during September to December 2013. Five hundred and four pediatricians completed self-administered questionnaires with a response rate of 92%. χ2 tests were used to compare categorical variables differences between smokers and non-smokers and other categorical variables. Results: Pediatricians thought that the key barriers to encouraging parents to quit smoking were: lack of professional training (94%), lack of time (84%), resistance to discussions about smoking (77%). 94% of the pediatricians agreed that smoking in enclosed public places should be prohibited and more than 70% agreed that smoking should not be allowed in any indoor places and in cars. Most of the pediatricians thought that their current knowledge on helping people to quit smoking and SHS exposure reduction counseling was insufficient. Conclusions: Many Chinese pediatricians did not have adequate knowledge about smoking and SHS, and many lacked confidence about giving cessation or SHS exposure reduction counseling to smoking parents. Lack of professional training and time were the most important barriers to help parents quit smoking among the Chinese pediatricians. Intensified efforts are called for to provide the necessary professional training and increase pediatricians’ participation in the training. View Full-Text
Keywords: pediatrician; secondhand smoke; exposure; smoking cessation pediatrician; secondhand smoke; exposure; smoking cessation
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Huang, K.; Abdullah, A.S.; Huo, H.; Liao, J.; Yang, L.; Zhang, Z.; Chen, H.; Nong, G.; Winickoff, J.P. Chinese Pediatrician Attitudes and Practices Regarding Child Exposure to Secondhand Smoke (SHS) and Clinical Efforts against SHS Exposure. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12, 5013-5025.

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