Next Article in Journal
Impact of an Educational Hands-on Project on the Antimicrobial, Antitumor and Anti-Inflammatory Properties of Plants on Portuguese Students’ Awareness, Knowledge, and Competences
Previous Article in Journal
Environmental Factors and WASH Practices in the Perinatal Period in Cambodia: Implications for Newborn Health
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12(3), 2411-2436; doi:10.3390/ijerph120302411

Cigarette Smoking and Alcohol Consumption among Chinese Older Adults: Do Living Arrangements Matter?

1
Department of Social Work, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong, China
2
The Ethelyn R. Strong School of Social Work, Norfolk State University, 700 Park Avenue, Norfolk, VA 23504, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Received: 8 December 2014 / Accepted: 16 February 2015 / Published: 23 February 2015
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1183 KB, uploaded 23 February 2015]   |  

Abstract

This study used five waves of the Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey to examine the relationship between living arrangements, smoking, and drinking among older adults in China from 1998–2008. We found that living arrangements had strong implications for cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption among the elderly. First, the likelihood of smoking was lower among older men living with children, and older women living either with a spouse, or with both a spouse and children; and the likelihood of drinking was lower among both older men, and women living with both a spouse and children, compared with those living alone. Second, among dual consumers (i.e., being a drinker and a smoker), the amount of alcohol consumption was lower among male dual consumers living with children, while the number of cigarettes smoked was higher among female dual consumers living with others, compared with those living alone. Third, among non-smoking drinkers, the alcohol consumption was lower among non-smoking male drinkers in all types of co-residential arrangements (i.e., living with a spouse, living with children, living with both a spouse and children, or living with others), and non-smoking female drinkers living with others, compared with those living alone. Results highlighted the importance of living arrangements to cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption among Chinese elderly. Co-residential arrangements provided constraints on Chinese older adults’ health-risk behaviors, and had differential effects for men and women. View Full-Text
Keywords: smoking; drinking; living arrangements; old adults; China smoking; drinking; living arrangements; old adults; China
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Zhang, J.; Wu, L. Cigarette Smoking and Alcohol Consumption among Chinese Older Adults: Do Living Arrangements Matter? Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12, 2411-2436.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top