Next Article in Journal
Cigarette Smoking and Alcohol Consumption among Chinese Older Adults: Do Living Arrangements Matter?
Previous Article in Journal
The Internet as a New Tool in the Rehabilitation Process of Patients—Education in Focus
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12(3), 2392-2410; doi:10.3390/ijerph120302392

Environmental Factors and WASH Practices in the Perinatal Period in Cambodia: Implications for Newborn Health

1
Department of Global Community Health and Behavioral Sciences, Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, 1440 Canal St., New Orleans, LA 70112, USA
2
National Institute of Public Health, #2 Kim Y Sung Blvd, Tuol Kork, Phnom Penh P.O. Box 1300, Cambodia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Received: 2 December 2014 / Accepted: 5 February 2015 / Published: 23 February 2015
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1843 KB, uploaded 23 February 2015]   |  

Abstract

Infection contributes to a significant proportion of neonatal death and disability worldwide, with the major burden occurring in the first week of life. Environmental conditions and gaps in water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) practices may contribute to the risk of infection, particularly in settings where health centers are expanding to meet the growing demand for skilled care at birth and homes do not have adequate access to water and sanitation. A qualitative approach was used to understand the environmental context for infection prevention and control (IPC) and WASH associated behaviors in health centers where women give birth, and in homes of newborns, in a rural Cambodian province. Structured observations and focus group discussions revealed important gaps in optimal practices, and both structural and social barriers to maintaining IPC during delivery and post-partum. Solutions are available to address the issues identified, and tackling these could result in marked environmental improvement for quality of care and neonatal outcomes. Water, sanitation and hygiene in home and health center environments are likely to be important contributors to health and should be addressed in strategies to improve neonatal survival. View Full-Text
Keywords: hygiene; WASH; newborn mortality; health facility strengthening; neonatal infection; structured observation; qualitative research hygiene; WASH; newborn mortality; health facility strengthening; neonatal infection; structured observation; qualitative research
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Bazzano, A.N.; Oberhelman, R.A.; Potts, K.S.; Gordon, A.; Var, C. Environmental Factors and WASH Practices in the Perinatal Period in Cambodia: Implications for Newborn Health. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12, 2392-2410.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top