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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12(12), 16136-16156; doi:10.3390/ijerph121215042

Effects of Extreme Temperatures on Cause-Specific Cardiovascular Mortality in China

1
Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Peking University, Beijing 100191, China
2
Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Jan C. Semenza
Received: 29 October 2015 / Revised: 12 December 2015 / Accepted: 14 December 2015 / Published: 21 December 2015
(This article belongs to the Collection Climate Change and Human Health)
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Abstract

Objective: Limited evidence is available for the effects of extreme temperatures on cause-specific cardiovascular mortality in China. Methods: We collected data from Beijing and Shanghai, China, during 2007–2009, including the daily mortality of cardiovascular disease, cerebrovascular disease, ischemic heart disease and hypertensive disease, as well as air pollution concentrations and weather conditions. We used Poisson regression with a distributed lag non-linear model to examine the effects of extremely high and low ambient temperatures on cause-specific cardiovascular mortality. Results: For all cause-specific cardiovascular mortality, Beijing had stronger cold and hot effects than those in Shanghai. The cold effects on cause-specific cardiovascular mortality reached the strongest at lag 0–27, while the hot effects reached the strongest at lag 0–14. The effects of extremely low and high temperatures differed by mortality types in the two cities. Hypertensive disease in Beijing was particularly susceptible to both extremely high and low temperatures; while for Shanghai, people with ischemic heart disease showed the greatest relative risk (RRs = 1.16, 95% CI: 1.03, 1.34) to extremely low temperature. Conclusion: People with hypertensive disease were particularly susceptible to extremely low and high temperatures in Beijing. People with ischemic heart disease in Shanghai showed greater susceptibility to extremely cold days. View Full-Text
Keywords: extreme temperatures; cardiovascular disease; cerebrovascular disease; ischemic heart disease; hypertensive disease; distributed lag non-linear model; susceptibility extreme temperatures; cardiovascular disease; cerebrovascular disease; ischemic heart disease; hypertensive disease; distributed lag non-linear model; susceptibility
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Wang, X.; Li, G.; Liu, L.; Westerdahl, D.; Jin, X.; Pan, X. Effects of Extreme Temperatures on Cause-Specific Cardiovascular Mortality in China. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12, 16136-16156.

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