Next Article in Journal
Association of Vitamin A Status with Overnutrition in Children and Adolescents
Next Article in Special Issue
Time Perspective and Emotion Regulation as Predictors of Age-Related Subjective Passage of Time
Previous Article in Journal
A Systematic Review and Meta-Regression Analysis of Lung Cancer Risk and Inorganic Arsenic in Drinking Water
Previous Article in Special Issue
Proofreading in Young and Older Adults: The Effect of Error Category and Comprehension Difficulty
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12(12), 15516-15530; doi:10.3390/ijerph121215003

Adult Lifespan Cognitive Variability in the Cross-Sectional Cam-CAN Cohort

1
Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Cambridge Institute of Public Health, Univeristy of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2-0SR, UK
2
Centre for Speech, Language and the Brain, Department of Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2-3EB, UK
3
MRC Biostatistics Unit, Cambridge CB2-0SR, UK
4
Institute of Health and Society, Newcastle University, Newcastle NE4-5PL, UK
5
Cambridge Centre for Ageing and Neuroscience (Cam-CAN), University of Cambridge and MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge, UK, www.cam-can.com
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Lori E. James
Received: 28 July 2015 / Revised: 27 November 2015 / Accepted: 1 December 2015 / Published: 7 December 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aging and Cognition)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [285 KB, uploaded 7 December 2015]   |  

Abstract

This study examines variability across the age span in cognitive performance in a cross-sectional, population-based, adult lifespan cohort from the Cambridge Centre for Ageing and Neuroscience (Cam-CAN) study (n = 2680). A key question we highlight is whether using measures that are designed to detect age-related cognitive pathology may not be sensitive to, or reflective of, individual variability among younger adults. We present three issues that contribute to the debate for and against age-related increases in variability. Firstly, the need to formally define measures of central tendency and measures of variability. Secondly, in addition to the commonly addressed location-confounding (adjusting for covariates) there may exist changes in measures of variability due to confounder sub-groups. Finally, that increases in spread may be a result of floor or ceiling effects; where the measure is not sensitive enough at all ages. From the Cam-CAN study, a large population-based dataset, we demonstrate the existence of variability-confounding for the immediate episodic memory task; and show that increasing variance with age in our general cognitive measures is driven by a ceiling effect in younger age groups. View Full-Text
Keywords: cognitive variability; adult lifespan; heterogeneity; MMSE; ceiling effects; variance confounders; verbal fluency; episodic memory cognitive variability; adult lifespan; heterogeneity; MMSE; ceiling effects; variance confounders; verbal fluency; episodic memory
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Green, E.; Shafto, M.A.; Matthews, F.E.; Cam-CAN; White, S.R. Adult Lifespan Cognitive Variability in the Cross-Sectional Cam-CAN Cohort. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12, 15516-15530.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top