Next Article in Journal
An Examination of Electronic Cigarette Content on Social Media: Analysis of E-Cigarette Flavor Content on Reddit
Next Article in Special Issue
Active Commuting Behaviors in a Nordic Metropolitan Setting in Relation to Modality, Gender, and Health Recommendations
Previous Article in Journal
Air Pollution Exposure and Physical Activity in China: Current Knowledge, Public Health Implications, and Future Research Needs
Previous Article in Special Issue
Physiological and Psychological Effects of a Walk in Urban Parks in Fall
Article Menu

Export Article

Comment published on 24 February 2016, see Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13(3), 250.

Open AccessArticle
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12(11), 14898-14915; doi:10.3390/ijerph121114898

The Effects of the Urban Built Environment on Mental Health: A Cohort Study in a Large Northern Italian City

1
Environmental Heritage and Urban Redevelopment Unit, SiTI—Higher Institute on Territorial Systems for Innovation, via Boggio 61, 10138 Torino, Italy
2
ASL Torino 5, Local Public Health Agency, piazza S. Pellico 1, 10023 Chieri, Italy
3
SEPI Grugliasco, Epidemiology Service for ASL Torino 3, Local Public Health Agency, via Sabaudia 164, 10095 Grugliasco, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Astrid Kemperman, Harry Timmermans and Pauline van den Berg
Received: 22 September 2015 / Revised: 13 November 2015 / Accepted: 16 November 2015 / Published: 20 November 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Impacts of the Built Environment on Public Health)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1439 KB, uploaded 20 November 2015]   |  

Abstract

Mental health (MH) has a relevant burden on the health of populations. Common MH disorders (anxiety and non-psychotic depression) are well associated to socioeconomic individual and neighborhood characteristics, but little is known about the influence of urban structure. We analyzed among a Turin (Northwest Italy) urban population the association at area level of different urban structure characteristics (density, accessibility by public transport, accessibility to services, green and public spaces) and consumption of antidepressants. Estimates were adjusted by individual socio-demographic variables (education, housing tenure, employment) and contextual social environment (SE) variables (social and physical disorder, crime rates). Data was extracted from the Turin Longitudinal Study (TLS)—a census-based cohort study following up prospectively the mortality and morbidity of the population. As expected, individual characteristics show the strongest association with antidepressant drug consumption, while among built environment (BE) indicators accessibility by public transport and urban density only are associated to MH, being slightly protective factors. Results from this study, in agreement with previous literature, suggest that BE has a stronger effect on MH for people who spend more time in the neighborhood. Therefore, this research suggests that good accessibility to public transport, as well as a dense urban structure (versus sprawl), could contribute to reduced risk of depression, especially for women and elderly, by increasing opportunities to move around and have an active social life. View Full-Text
Keywords: built environment; urban structure; Turin Longitudinal Study; health; inequalities; social environment; accessibility; public transport; urban density built environment; urban structure; Turin Longitudinal Study; health; inequalities; social environment; accessibility; public transport; urban density
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Melis, G.; Gelormino, E.; Marra, G.; Ferracin, E.; Costa, G. The Effects of the Urban Built Environment on Mental Health: A Cohort Study in a Large Northern Italian City. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12, 14898-14915.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top