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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12(1), 652-666; doi:10.3390/ijerph120100652

Work Related Stress, Burnout, Job Satisfaction and General Health of Nurses

1
Department of Public Health, School of Health Sciences, Monash South Africa, 144 Peter Road, Roodepoort, 1725 Johannesburg, South Africa
2
Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, Victoria, 3004 Melbourne, Australia
3
School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Victoria, 3010 Melbourne, Australia
4
Department of Psychology, University of Free State, Bloemfontein 9300, South Africa
5
ASEAN Institute for Health Development, Mahidol University, Salaya, Phutthamonthon, Nakhonpathom 73170, Thailand
6
HIV/AIDS/STIS and TB Research Unit (HAST), Human Sciences Research Council, Pretoria 0001, South Africa
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Received: 10 November 2014 / Accepted: 25 December 2014 / Published: 12 January 2015
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Abstract

Gaps in research focusing on work related stress, burnout, job satisfaction and general health of nurses is evident within developing contexts like South Africa. This study identified the relationship between work related stress, burnout, job satisfaction and general health of nurses. A total of 1200 nurses from four hospitals were invited to participate in this cross-sectional study (75% response rate). Participants completed five questionnaires and multiple linear regression analysis was used to determine significant relationships between variables. Staff issues are best associated with burnout as well as job satisfaction. Burnout explained the highest amount of variance in mental health of nurses. These are known to compromise productivity and performance, as well as affect the quality of patient care. Issues, such as security risks in the workplace, affect job satisfaction and health of nurses. Although this is more salient to developing contexts it is important in developing strategies and intervention programs towards improving nurse and patient related outcomes. View Full-Text
Keywords: burnout; general health; job satisfaction; nurses; work related stress burnout; general health; job satisfaction; nurses; work related stress
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Khamisa, N.; Oldenburg, B.; Peltzer, K.; Ilic, D. Work Related Stress, Burnout, Job Satisfaction and General Health of Nurses. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12, 652-666.

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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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