Next Article in Journal
Drinking Water Management: Health Risk Perceptions and Choices in First Nations and Non-First Nations Communities in Canada
Next Article in Special Issue
Recruitment and Baseline Characteristics of Participants in the Finnish Geriatric Intervention Study to Prevent Cognitive Impairment and Disability (FINGER)—A Randomized Controlled Lifestyle Trial
Previous Article in Journal
Walkability is Only Part of the Story: Walking for Transportation in Stuttgart, Germany
Previous Article in Special Issue
Sudomotor Function as a Tool for Cardiorespiratory Fitness Level Evaluation: Comparison with Maximal Exercise Capacity
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessReview
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11(6), 5866-5888; doi:10.3390/ijerph110605866

What Works in Community-Based Interventions Promoting Physical Activity and Healthy Eating? A Review of Reviews

1
Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology—BIPS, Achterstrasse 30, 28359 Bremen, Germany
2
Research Focus Health Sciences Bremen, University of Bremen, 28359 Bremen, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 28 February 2014 / Revised: 14 May 2014 / Accepted: 20 May 2014 / Published: 30 May 2014
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lifestyle Intervention for Chronic Diseases Prevention)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [489 KB, uploaded 19 June 2014]   |  

Abstract

Chronic diseases, such as type II diabetes, are on the rise worldwide. There is consistent evidence that physical activity and healthy eating are important lifestyle factors which affect the risk for chronic diseases. Community-based interventions are of particular public health interest as they reach target groups in their natural living environment and may thus achieve high population-level impacts. We conducted a systematic literature search to assess the effectiveness of community-based interventions to promote physical activity and healthy eating. Specifically, we searched for promising intervention strategies in this setting. We narratively summarized the results of 18 systematic reviews. Among children and adolescents, we found moderate evidence for effects on weight change in primary school-aged children for interventions containing a school component. The evidence for interventions aimed at general adult populations was inconclusive. Self-monitoring, group-based components, and motivational signs to encourage stair use were identified as promising strategies to increase physical activity. Among adults at risk for type II diabetes, evidence was found for beneficial effects on weight change and diabetes incidence. However, interventions for this group were not integrated in more comprehensive community-based approaches. View Full-Text
Keywords: prevention; chronic diseases; health promotion; physical activity; healthy eating; community prevention; chronic diseases; health promotion; physical activity; healthy eating; community
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 3.0).

Supplementary material

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Brand, T.; Pischke, C.R.; Steenbock, B.; Schoenbach, J.; Poettgen, S.; Samkange-Zeeb, F.; Zeeb, H. What Works in Community-Based Interventions Promoting Physical Activity and Healthy Eating? A Review of Reviews. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11, 5866-5888.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top