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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11(5), 4782-4798; doi:10.3390/ijerph110504782
Article

Facilitators and Barriers to Effective Smoking Cessation: Counselling Services for Inpatients from Nurse-Counsellors’ Perspectives — A Qualitative Study

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Received: 22 January 2014; in revised form: 29 April 2014 / Accepted: 29 April 2014 / Published: 6 May 2014
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Substance and Drug Abuse Prevention)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [191 KB, uploaded 19 June 2014]
Abstract: Tobacco use has reached epidemic levels around the World, resulting in a world-wide increase in tobacco-related deaths and disabilities. Hospitalization presents an opportunity for nurses to encourage inpatients to quit smoking. This qualitative descriptive study was aimed to explore nurse-counsellors’ perspectives of facilitators and barriers in the implementation of effective smoking cessation counselling services for inpatients. In-depth interviews were conducted with 16 nurses who were qualified smoking cessation counsellors and who were recruited from eleven health promotion hospitals that were smoke-free and located in the Greater Taipei City Area.  Data were collected from May 2012 to October 2012, and then analysed using content analysis based on the grounded theory approach. From nurse-counsellors’ perspectives, an effective smoking cessation program should be patient-centred and provide a supportive environment. Another finding is that effective smoking cessation counselling involves encouraging patients to modify their lifestyles. Time constraints and inadequate resources are barriers that inhibit the effectiveness of smoking cessation counselling programs in acute-care hospitals. We suggest that hospitals should set up a smoking counselling follow-up program, including funds, facilities, and trained personnel to deliver counselling services by telephone, and build a network with community smoking cessation resources.
Keywords: smoking cessation; counsellor; nurse; inpatient smoker; qualitative study; in-depth interviews smoking cessation; counsellor; nurse; inpatient smoker; qualitative study; in-depth interviews
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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MDPI and ACS Style

Li, I.-C.; Lee, S.-Y.D.; Chen, C.-Y.; Jeng, Y.-Q.; Chen, Y.-C. Facilitators and Barriers to Effective Smoking Cessation: Counselling Services for Inpatients from Nurse-Counsellors’ Perspectives — A Qualitative Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11, 4782-4798.

AMA Style

Li I-C, Lee S-YD, Chen C-Y, Jeng Y-Q, Chen Y-C. Facilitators and Barriers to Effective Smoking Cessation: Counselling Services for Inpatients from Nurse-Counsellors’ Perspectives — A Qualitative Study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2014; 11(5):4782-4798.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Li, I-Chuan; Lee, Shoou-Yih D.; Chen, Chiu-Yen; Jeng, Yu-Qian; Chen, Yu-Chi. 2014. "Facilitators and Barriers to Effective Smoking Cessation: Counselling Services for Inpatients from Nurse-Counsellors’ Perspectives — A Qualitative Study." Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 11, no. 5: 4782-4798.


Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert