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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11(2), 1942-1959; doi:10.3390/ijerph110201942
Article

Effect of Ambient Temperature on Australian Northern Territory Public Hospital Admissions for Cardiovascular Disease among Indigenous and Non-Indigenous Populations

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Received: 22 November 2013; in revised form: 21 January 2014 / Accepted: 22 January 2014 / Published: 13 February 2014
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Change and Human Health)
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Abstract: Hospitalisations are associated with ambient temperature, but little is known about responses in population sub-groups. In this study, heat responses for Indigenous and non-Indigenous people in two age groups were examined for two categories of cardiac diseases using daily hospital admissions from five Northern Territory hospitals (1992–2011). Admission rates during the hottest five per cent of days and the coolest five per cent of days were compared with rates at other times. Among 25–64 year olds, the Indigenous female population was more adversely affected by very hot days than the non-Indigenous female population, with admission rates for ischaemic heart disease (IHD) increasing by 32%. People older than 65 were more sensitive to cold, with non-Indigenous male admissions for heart failure increasing by 64%, and for IHD by 29%. For older Indigenous males, IHD admissions increased by 52% during cold conditions. For older non-Indigenous females, increases in admissions for heart failure were around 50% on these cold days, and 64% for older Indigenous females. We conclude that under projected climate change conditions, admissions for IHD amongst younger Indigenous people would increase in hot conditions, while admissions among elderly people during cold weather may be reduced. The responses to temperature, while showing significant relationships across the Northern Territory, may vary by region. These variations were not explored in this assessment.
Keywords: Indigenous health; hospital admissions; climate; ambient temperature; cardiovascular disease; Australia Indigenous health; hospital admissions; climate; ambient temperature; cardiovascular disease; Australia
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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MDPI and ACS Style

Webb, L.; Bambrick, H.; Tait, P.; Green, D.; Alexander, L. Effect of Ambient Temperature on Australian Northern Territory Public Hospital Admissions for Cardiovascular Disease among Indigenous and Non-Indigenous Populations. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11, 1942-1959.

AMA Style

Webb L, Bambrick H, Tait P, Green D, Alexander L. Effect of Ambient Temperature on Australian Northern Territory Public Hospital Admissions for Cardiovascular Disease among Indigenous and Non-Indigenous Populations. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2014; 11(2):1942-1959.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Webb, Leanne; Bambrick, Hilary; Tait, Peter; Green, Donna; Alexander, Lisa. 2014. "Effect of Ambient Temperature on Australian Northern Territory Public Hospital Admissions for Cardiovascular Disease among Indigenous and Non-Indigenous Populations." Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 11, no. 2: 1942-1959.



Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert