Next Article in Journal
It’s Not That Simple: Tobacco Use Identification and Documentation in Acute Care
Next Article in Special Issue
Dietary Nickel Chloride Induces Oxidative Intestinal Damage in Broilers
Previous Article in Journal
Screening and Brief Interventions for Hazardous and Harmful Alcohol Use among University Students in South Africa: Results from a Randomized Controlled Trial
Previous Article in Special Issue
Monoclonal Antibody-Based Sandwich ELISA for the Detection of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin A
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(5), 2058-2068; doi:10.3390/ijerph10052058
Article

A Higher Prevalence Rate of Campylobacter in Retail Beef Livers Compared to Other Beef and Pork Meat Cuts

 and *
Received: 27 March 2013; in revised form: 10 May 2013 / Accepted: 13 May 2013 / Published: 21 May 2013
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Safety and Public Health)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [174 KB, uploaded 19 June 2014]
Abstract: The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli in retail beef, beef livers, and pork meats purchased from the Tulsa (OK, USA) area and to further characterize the isolates obtained through antimicrobial susceptibility testing. A total of 97 chilled retail beef (50 beef livers and 47 other cuts), and 100 pork samples were collected. The prevalence of Campylobacter in beef livers was 39/50 (78%), while no Campylobacter was isolated from the other beef cuts. The prevalence in pork samples was 2/100 (2%). A total of 108 Campylobacter isolates (102 beef livers isolates and six pork isolates) were subjected to antimicrobial resistance profiling against sixteen different antimicrobials that belong to eight different antibiotic classes. Of the six pork Campylobacter coli isolates, four showed resistance to all antimicrobials tested. Among the beef liver isolates, the highest antibiotic resistances were to tetracyclines and β-lactams, while the lowest resistances were to macrolides, aminoglycosides, lincosamides, and phenicols. Resistances to the fluoroquinolone, macrolide, aminoglycoside, tetracycline, b-lactam, lincosamide, and phenicol antibiotic classes were significantly higher in Campylobacter coli than Campylobacter jejuni isolates. Multidrug Resistance (MDR) among the 102 Campylobacter (33 Campylobacter jejuni and 69 Campylobacter coli) beef liver isolates was significantly higher in Campylobacter coli (62%) than Campylobacter jejuni (39%). The high prevalence of Campylobacter in retail beef livers and their antimicrobial resistance raise concern about the safety of these retail products.
Keywords: Campylobacter; antibiotic resistance; prevalence; retail beef; beef livers; retail pork; foodborne pathogens Campylobacter; antibiotic resistance; prevalence; retail beef; beef livers; retail pork; foodborne pathogens
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Export to BibTeX |
EndNote


MDPI and ACS Style

Noormohamed, A.; Fakhr, M.K. A Higher Prevalence Rate of Campylobacter in Retail Beef Livers Compared to Other Beef and Pork Meat Cuts. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10, 2058-2068.

AMA Style

Noormohamed A, Fakhr MK. A Higher Prevalence Rate of Campylobacter in Retail Beef Livers Compared to Other Beef and Pork Meat Cuts. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2013; 10(5):2058-2068.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Noormohamed, Aneesa; Fakhr, Mohamed K. 2013. "A Higher Prevalence Rate of Campylobacter in Retail Beef Livers Compared to Other Beef and Pork Meat Cuts." Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 10, no. 5: 2058-2068.


Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert