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Sensors 2017, 17(2), 424; doi:10.3390/s17020424

Experimental Validation of Depth Cameras for the Parameterization of Functional Balance of Patients in Clinical Tests

1
MAPIR-UMA Group, Department Ingeniería de Sistemas y Automática. Universidad de Málaga, Instituto de Investigación Biomédica de Málaga (IBIMA), Málaga 29071, Spain
2
Departamento de Fisioterapia, Universidad de Málaga, Grupo Clinimetría FE-14, Instituto de Investigación Biomédica de Málaga (IBIMA), Málaga 29071, Spain
3
Departamento de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad de Jaén, Jaén 23071, Spain
4
School of Clinical Sciences of the Faculty of Health, the Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane QLD 4000, Australia
These authors contributed equally to this work.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Panicos Kyriacou
Received: 24 November 2016 / Revised: 25 January 2017 / Accepted: 19 February 2017 / Published: 22 February 2017
(This article belongs to the Collection Sensors for Globalized Healthy Living and Wellbeing)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [6744 KB, uploaded 22 February 2017]   |  

Abstract

In clinical practice, patients’ balance can be assessed using standard scales. Two of the most validated clinical tests for measuring balance are the Timed Up and Go (TUG) test and the MultiDirectional Reach Test (MDRT). Nowadays, inertial sensors (IS) are employed for kinematic analysis of functional tests in the clinical setting, and have become an alternative to expensive, 3D optical motion capture systems. In daily clinical practice, however, IS-based setups are yet cumbersome and inconvenient to apply. Current depth cameras have the potential for such application, presenting many advantages as, for instance, being portable, low-cost and minimally-invasive. This paper aims at experimentally validating to what extent this technology can substitute IS for the parameterization and kinematic analysis of the TUG and the MDRT tests. Twenty healthy young adults were recruited as participants to perform five different balance tests while kinematic data from their movements were measured by both a depth camera and an inertial sensor placed on their trunk. The reliability of the camera’s measurements is examined through the Interclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC), whilst the Pearson Correlation Coefficient (r) is computed to evaluate the correlation between both sensor’s measurements, revealing excellent reliability and strong correlations in most cases. View Full-Text
Keywords: depth camera; inertial sensor; multi-directional reach test; timed up and go; healthy young adults depth camera; inertial sensor; multi-directional reach test; timed up and go; healthy young adults
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Moreno, F.-Á.; Merchán-Baeza, J.A.; González-Sánchez, M.; González-Jiménez, J.; Cuesta-Vargas, A.I. Experimental Validation of Depth Cameras for the Parameterization of Functional Balance of Patients in Clinical Tests. Sensors 2017, 17, 424.

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