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Sensors 2016, 16(9), 1352; doi:10.3390/s16091352

The Finite Element Analysis for a Mini-Conductance Probe in Horizontal Oil-Water Two-Phase Flow

1
School of Information Science and Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004, Hebei, China
2
Key Laboratory for Computer Virtual Technology and System Integration of Hebei Province, Qinhuangdao 066004, Hebei, China
3
Logging and Testing Services Company, Daqing Oilfield Limited Company, Daqing 163453, Heilongjiang, China
4
Daqing Oilfield Limited Company, Daqing 163453, Heilongjiang, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Vittorio M. N. Passaro
Received: 18 June 2016 / Revised: 4 August 2016 / Accepted: 15 August 2016 / Published: 24 August 2016
(This article belongs to the Section Physical Sensors)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [4341 KB, uploaded 26 August 2016]   |  

Abstract

Oil-water two-phase flow is widespread in petroleum industry processes. The study of oil-water two-phase flow in horizontal pipes and the liquid holdup measurement of oil-water two-phase flow are of great importance for the optimization of the oil production process. This paper presents a novel sensor, i.e., a mini-conductance probe (MCP) for measuring pure-water phase conductivity of oil-water segregated flow in horizontal pipes. The MCP solves the difficult problem of obtaining the pure-water correction for water holdup measurements by using a ring-shaped conductivity water-cut meter (RSCWCM). Firstly, using the finite element method (FEM), the spatial sensitivity field of the MCP is investigated and the optimized MCP geometry structure is determined in terms of the characteristic parameters. Then, the responses of the MCP for the oil-water segregated flow are calculated, and it is found that the MCP has better stability and sensitivity to the variation of water-layer thickness in the condition of high water holdup and low flow velocity. Finally, the static experiments for the oil-water segregated flow were carried out and a novel calibration method for pure-water phase conductivity measurements was presented. The validity of the pure-water phase conductivity measurement with segregated flow in horizontal pipes was verified by experimental results. View Full-Text
Keywords: horizontal oil-water segregated flow; mini-conductance probe (MCP); finite element method (FEM); sensitivity field; design and geometry optimization; pure-water phase conductivity measurement horizontal oil-water segregated flow; mini-conductance probe (MCP); finite element method (FEM); sensitivity field; design and geometry optimization; pure-water phase conductivity measurement
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Kong, W.; Kong, L.; Li, L.; Liu, X.; Xie, R.; Li, J.; Tang, H. The Finite Element Analysis for a Mini-Conductance Probe in Horizontal Oil-Water Two-Phase Flow. Sensors 2016, 16, 1352.

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