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Sensors 2016, 16(8), 1232; doi:10.3390/s16081232

A Review: Origins of the Dielectric Properties of Proteins and Potential Development as Bio-Sensors

1
Joint Research Unit Agropolymers Engineering and Emerging Technologies, UMR 1208 INRA/SupAgroM/UMII/CIRAD, 2 Place Pierre Viala, Montpellier 34060, France
2
B. SORLI, Institut d’Electronique et des Systèmes, Université Montpellier 2, 860 Rue Saint-Priest, Montpellier 34090, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Alexander Star
Received: 23 May 2016 / Revised: 19 July 2016 / Accepted: 29 July 2016 / Published: 4 August 2016
(This article belongs to the Section Biosensors)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1972 KB, uploaded 4 August 2016]   |  

Abstract

Polymers can be classified as synthetic polymers and natural polymers, and are often characterized by their most typical functions namely their high mechanical resistivity, electrical conductivity and dielectric properties. This bibliography report consists in: (i) Defining the origins of the dielectric properties of natural polymers by reviewing proteins. Despite their complex molecular chains, proteins present several points of interest, particularly, their charge content conferring their electrical and dielectric properties; (ii) Identifying factors influencing the dielectric properties of protein films. The effects of vapors and gases such as water vapor, oxygen, carbon dioxide, ammonia and ethanol on the dielectric properties are put forward; (iii) Finally, potential development of protein films as bio-sensors coated on electronic devices for detection of environmental changes particularly humidity or carbon dioxide content in relation with dielectric properties variations are discussed. As the study of the dielectric properties implies imposing an electric field to the material, it was necessary to evaluate the impact of frequency on the polymers and subsequently on their structure. Characterization techniques, on the one hand dielectric spectroscopy devoted for the determination of the glass transition temperature among others, and on the other hand other techniques such as infra-red spectroscopy for structure characterization as a function of moisture content for instance are also introduced. View Full-Text
Keywords: dielectric permittivity and loss; bio-sensor; proteins; dielectric and structure modification; vapors and gases; physico-chemical properties dielectric permittivity and loss; bio-sensor; proteins; dielectric and structure modification; vapors and gases; physico-chemical properties
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Bibi, F.; Villain, M.; Guillaume, C.; Sorli, B.; Gontard, N. A Review: Origins of the Dielectric Properties of Proteins and Potential Development as Bio-Sensors. Sensors 2016, 16, 1232.

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