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Sensors 2016, 16(8), 1229; doi:10.3390/s16081229

Frequency Splitting Analysis and Compensation Method for Inductive Wireless Powering of Implantable Biosensors

Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University College London, London WC1E 7JE, UK
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Alexander Star
Received: 23 May 2016 / Revised: 19 July 2016 / Accepted: 29 July 2016 / Published: 4 August 2016
(This article belongs to the Section Biosensors)
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Abstract

Inductive powering for implanted medical devices, such as implantable biosensors, is a safe and effective technique that allows power to be delivered to implants wirelessly, avoiding the use of transcutaneous wires or implanted batteries. Wireless powering is very sensitive to a number of link parameters, including coil distance, alignment, shape, and load conditions. The optimum drive frequency of an inductive link varies depending on the coil spacing and load. This paper presents an optimum frequency tracking (OFT) method, in which an inductive power link is driven at a frequency that is maintained at an optimum value to ensure that the link is working at resonance, and the output voltage is maximised. The method is shown to provide significant improvements in maintained secondary voltage and system efficiency for a range of loads when the link is overcoupled. The OFT method does not require the use of variable capacitors or inductors. When tested at frequencies around a nominal frequency of 5 MHz, the OFT method provides up to a twofold efficiency improvement compared to a fixed frequency drive. The system can be readily interfaced with passive implants or implantable biosensors, and lends itself to interfacing with designs such as distributed implanted sensor networks, where each implant is operating at a different frequency. View Full-Text
Keywords: frequency splitting; frequency tuning; implantable biosensors; inductive link; inductive powering; medical implants; wireless power transfer frequency splitting; frequency tuning; implantable biosensors; inductive link; inductive powering; medical implants; wireless power transfer
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Schormans, M.; Valente, V.; Demosthenous, A. Frequency Splitting Analysis and Compensation Method for Inductive Wireless Powering of Implantable Biosensors. Sensors 2016, 16, 1229.

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